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FRIDAY, June 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) – A diet designed to boost brain health appears to benefit people with multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests.

For the study, a team from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City examined 185 people diagnosed with MS within the past five years. Each had MRI brain scans and responded to detailed questionnaires.

The upsh...

More and more Americans are seeking out healthier, greener and more ethical alternatives to meat, but are plant-based alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat truly nutritious substitutes?

The answer is yes, according to new research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. It found the imitation meats to be a good source of fiber, folate and iron while containing ...

The U.S. fast-food industry has boosted spending on ads targeting kids, especially Black and Hispanic youth, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on ad spending and TV ad exposure for 274 fast-food restaurants and found that annual spending hit $5 billion in 2019, up more than $400 million between 2012 and 2019.

"Fast-food consumption by children and teen...

Breast cancer patients who have adequate levels of vitamin D - the "sunshine vitamin" - at the time of their diagnosis have better long-term outcomes, a new study finds.

Combined with the results of prior research, the new findings suggest "an ongoing benefit for patients who maintain sufficient levels [of vitamin D] through and beyond breast cancer treatment," said study lead author Son...

Hoping to eat your way to a healthier heart?

Diets rich in plant foods may beat low-fat eating regimens for cutting the risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

Saturated fat, the kind largely found in animal products, has long been viewed as the enemy of the heart, since it can raise "bad" LDL cholesterol.

In the new study, which tracked more than 5,100 Americans,...

People who have Crohn's disease often seek to ease their symptoms by changing what they eat, and new research suggests the Mediterranean diet may be their best bet.

The study evaluated one of the commonly used diets for Crohn's disease, known as the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD), comparing it with the Mediterranean diet, which is sometimes recommended by doctors for its heart health be...

TUESDAY, June 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) - If you're like most American adults, it might be time to reach for a piece of fruit, a plate of vegetables or a bowl of whole grains.

Only 7% of adults get enough fiber, a type of carbohydrate that passes through the body undigested and supports not only regular bowel movements, but also offers important health benefits. Too little fiber is associa...

Fewer temptations at checkout?

People may spend more money when they buy their groceries online, but they also tend to buy fewer unhealthy, "impulse-sensitive" foods like candy and cookies, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers looked at the shopping habits of 137 primary household shoppers in Maine to compare their in-store and online purchases. The shoppers had shopp...

Advocates of plant-based diets suggest they can reduce the risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and help the environment.

Now, new research suggests they may provide another health benefit: lowering COVID-19 severity.

A plant-based diet was associated with 73% lower odds of moderate to severe COVID-19 infection in the study. A pescatarian diet, which includes fish but l...

Women whose diets tend to feed inflammation may have a heightened risk of breast cancer, a preliminary study suggests.

The study, of more than 350,000 women, found that the more "pro-inflammatory" foods women consumed, the higher their breast cancer risk.

The term refers to foods thought to contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation throughout the body - a state implicated in vari...

The portion of food that you put on your plate and how fast you eat it could determine how much you're eating -- or potentially overeating.

A new study found that when people were given larger portions of macaroni and cheese for lunch, they ate more, as much as 43% more when the portion size was increased by 75%.

Those who ate faster or took bigger bites also tended to eat more fo...

Want to lower your risk of diabetes? Eat plenty of fruit.

An Australian study suggests that two servings a day could lower the odds of developing type 2 diabetes by 36%.

"A healthy diet and lifestyle, which includes the consumption of whole fruits, is a great strategy to lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes," said lead author Nicola Bondonno of the Institute for Nutrition R...

If you're planning to get pregnant or already "eating for two," sticking to a healthy diet may reduce the risk of several common pregnancy complications, researchers say.

The new study included nearly 1,900 women who completed diet questionnaires at eight to 13 weeks of pregnancy, along with estimates of what they ate in the previous three months.

At 16 to 22 weeks and 24 to 29 week...

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

If you can't stand broccoli, celery or kale, you may be a supertaster, and it just might protect you from COVID-19.

Supertasters are folks who are highly sensitive to bitterness. They're not only less likely to get COVID-19 than people who aren't so sensitive to sharp, pungent flavors, they're also less likely to wind up hospitalized with it, the researchers said.

What's more, super...

It's consistently rated high among diets for all-around health, and a new report finds the DASH diet is all-around good for your heart, too.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) regimen is designed to lower high blood pressure, but this new research shows that it also reduces inflammation, heart injury and strain.

The study provides "some of the strongest evidence that...

For people worried about developing dementia due to their family history, a preliminary study offers some good news: A healthy lifestyle might curb your risk.

Researchers found that older adults with healthy habits had a lower risk of developing dementia, versus the less health-conscious -- even if a parent or sibling had suffered from the brain disease.

Lifestyle choices did not er...

Colon cancer is on the rise among people under 50, and the million-dollar question is why.

Now, new research suggests that certain lifestyle factors, such as eating lots of red meat and heavy alcohol consumption, may play a role in this increase.

"The occurrence of colorectal cancer in people less than 50 years of age is increasing in many countries, but the causes of this are poorl...

Not only have humans and their ancient ancestors been eating carbs for longer than was realized, but a new study finds these starchy foods may actually have played a part in the growth of the human brain.

A new study researching the history of the human oral microbiome found that Neanderthals and ancient humans adapted to eating starchy foods as far back as 100,000 years ago, which is mu...

There's more evidence that a switch away from meat in your diet could cut levels of unhealthy "biomarkers" that encourage disease, researchers say.

A new study reported Saturday at the virtual European Congress on Obesity (ECO) found that people on vegetarian diets have lower blood levels of disease-linked biomarkers, such as "bad" (LDL) cholesterol and other factors.

Biomarkers can...

Women who get pregnant within a year of having weight-loss surgery are more likely to have preterm and smaller-than-normal babies, a new study suggests.

Dutch researchers said their findings support current recommendations to avoid pregnancy for 12 to 24 months after weight-loss (bariatric) surgery.

"We should encourage women who wish to conceive after bariatric surgery to avoid pre...

Young Black American women have high rates of lifestyle-related risk factors for heart disease, a new study indicates.

The findings show the need to help them adopt healthy eating and physical activity habits, as well as make it easier for them to access health care, the researchers said.

"Young people should be the healthiest members of our population, with normal body weight and n...

Famed Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton may have suffered from a deficiency of the nutrient thiamine, a condition known as beriberi, say researchers who claim they have cracked this nearly 120-year-old mystery.

Shackleton is known for his daring expeditions to Antarctica in the early 20th century. He experienced prolonged bouts of extreme shortness of breath and physical weakness on t...

People may think they know what 'Best before' food date labels mean, but a new study reveals that many consumers misunderstand them.

The study of over 2,600 U.S. adults "showed that an overwhelming majority of consumers say that they use food date labels to make decisions about food and say they know what the labels mean," said study author Catherine Turvey,. She's from the department of ...

Many people take fish oil to protect their heart, but a new study suggests that prescription versions may raise the risk of a common heart rhythm disorder.

At issue are prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids, which are naturally found in fish oil. The medications are often prescribed to people with very high triglycerides, a type of blood fat linked to increased risk of he...

A U.S. hospital has seen a surge in the number of kids with a life-threatening complication of type 2 diabetes.

The trend at Children's Hospital Los Angeles highlights how the COVID-19 pandemic may be affecting kids' health in unexpected ways, according to a new study led by Dr. Lily Chao, interim medical diabetes director.

Her team noticed in March 2020 that an increasing number of...

Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

"We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

It's no secret that too much sugar and saturated fat aren't good for you, but what food combos put you at greater risk for heart disease and death in middle age?

The answer, from a new University of Oxford study, is likely to disappoint a lot of folks.

Researchers found that diets heavy in chocolate and pastries, butter, table sugar, sodas and fruit juices -- and low in fresh fruit ...

If you've ever scoffed at warnings that too much red or processed meat is bad for the heart while oily fish is good for you, there's now some visual evidence to support that advice.

British researchers used heart imaging to see how these foods affected volunteers' heart health.

The images revealed that those who ate more red and processed meat had poorer heart function, smaller vent...

Meatpacking plants were the source of an estimated 334,000 COVID-19 cases in the United States, according to a new study. It puts the economic toll stemming from those cases at $11.2 billion.

And study author Tina Saitone, a livestock and rangeland economics cooperative extension specialist at the University of California, Davis, said those numbers are conservative.

The research inc...

Garlic is a food of legends, supposedly capable of providing protection against everything from common colds to heart disease - not to mention vampires and werewolves.

But does it really ward off as many health ills as its reputation suggests?

"That might be a stretch," said Kristina Petersen, an assistant professor in the department of nutritional sciences at Texas Tech University ...

People who eat plenty of vegetables, fish and fiber may have more inflammation-fighting bacteria in their guts, but fast-food lovers may be feeding inflammatory microbes.

That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at people's diet habits and the makeup of their gut "microbiome."

The term refers to the vast collection of bacteria and other microbes that naturally dwell in the g...

Energy drinks provide millions with a quick, caffeinated boost, but one young man's story could be a warning about overconsumption, experts say.

In the case of the 21-year-old, daily heavy intake of these drinks may have led to life-threatening heart and kidney failure, British doctors reported April 15 in BMJ Case Reports.

The young man reported drinking an average of four...

Americans' eating habits have changed for the worse during the COVID-19 pandemic, including an increase in eating disorders, researchers say.

For their study, the University of Minnesota team analyzed information gathered between April and May of 2020 from participants in a study called Project EAT.

The analysis found a link between the pandemic and several unhealthy eating habits. ...

Taking a deep dive into how Americans eat, a new dietary analysis finds that no matter where people get their food, bad nutrition rules the day, with one key exception: schools.

The conclusion is based on surveys conducted among 61,000 adults and children between 2003 and 2018. Respondents' answers revealed that the quality of much of the food they've been getting from restaurants, grocer...

Midnight snacks might feel satisfying in the moment -- but they can also knock people off their game at work the next day, a new study suggests.

The study, which followed nearly 100 employees, found a connection between "unhealthy" eating in the evening and under-performance at work the next day.

In general, people tended to be disengaged at work when they felt they'd overindulged t...

When it comes to guarding against colon cancer, what you eat is everything.

You can reduce your risk of colon cancer by eating five food types, an expert says. These include: vegetables; whole grains; legumes; nuts and seeds; and fiber-rich fruit.

"Vegetables contain cancer-preventing nutrients called carotenoids and flavonoids," said Amy Rosenfeld, program coordinator of community ...

A trip down a grocery store's baking goods aisle can leave you in a daze these days if you're thinking about replacing white or all-purpose flour with one of the many alternatives on shelves.

In recent years, the pantry staple used for baking and making pasta has become a dietary public enemy, giving way to healthier nut and seed flours, such as almond, chickpea and even banana.

But...

That piece of sausage you're about to enjoy? You may want to put it down for something healthier.

New research found an association between eating even small amounts of processed meats, 150 grams (a little over 5 ounces) per week, and a higher risk of major heart disease and death.

But not all meat is bad: The study, which includes data from 21 countries, also found that eating up t...

Live well, live longer.

New research offers more evidence that the mantra rings true: People who got regular exercise and ate a healthy diet in middle age had a reduced risk of serious health problems as seniors.

"Health care professionals could use these findings to further promote and emphasize to their patients the benefits of a healthy diet and a regular exercise schedule t...

Middle-aged adults looking to boost their muscle mass do not need to bulk up on protein, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 10 weeks of strength training plus a moderate amount of protein were enough to build muscle in previously sedentary middle-aged people. And extra protein brought no added gains.

The findings run counter to a common belief among exercisers, said resear...

If you want to improve your muscle function, regular helpings of leafy green vegetables might do the trick, new research suggests.

"Our study has shown that diets high in nitrate-rich vegetables may bolster your muscle strength independently of any physical activity," said lead author Marc Sim, from the Institute for Nutrition Research at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia.

...

Whether it's takeout or dining in, lives filled with lots of restaurant fare could turn out to be shorter, new research shows.

The study found that dining out frequently -- two or more meals prepared away from home each day -- is tied to an increased risk of death from any cause.

One nutritionist who wasn't involved in the study said the findings come as little surprise.

"Many...

More than half of the food Americans eat is "ultra-processed" -- and it's making them sick.

Higher consumption of these highly processed foods is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, according to a new study, and yet they account for 58% of calories in a U.S. diet. Each additional serving increased the risk.

You might not even realize that a food yo...

Could the time you eat your breakfast determine your health?

Yes, suggests new research that finds eating your morning meal before 8:30 a.m. may reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

People in the study who ate breakfast early had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance than folks who ate a later breakfast. Insulin resistance occurs when your body becomes res...

A healthy, plant-based diet could reduce your risk of stroke by up to 10%, researchers say.

This type of diet includes greater amounts of foods like vegetables, whole grains and beans, and fewer less-healthy foods like refined grains or added sugars.

"Many studies already show that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can reduce your risk of all kinds of diseases, from heart ...

For people with heart disease, eating fish twice a week may be a lifesaver.

New worldwide research shows that two 6-ounce servings a week of oily fish, like salmon, might help prevent cardiovascular disease in high-risk people, such as those who have heart disease or who have experienced a stroke.

"Eating at least two servings of fish each week appears to lower your risk of future c...

If a nice hot cup of tea sounds good to you, there's even more reason to enjoy one now. Scientists have gained new insight into how tea helps lower blood pressure, perhaps pointing the way to new types of blood pressure medications.

The researchers found that certain compounds in both black and green tea help relax blood vessels by activating ion channel proteins in the walls of blood ves...

Five servings. That is all the fruits and vegetables you need to eat every day to live longer, new research suggests.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 2 million people in the United States and dozens of other countries and found that eating about five servings of fruits and vegetables a day was associated with the lowest risk of early death, and that the optimal balance was two ser...

Helping your brain stay sharp with age may be as simple as changing up the food on your plate at dinnertime, a new study suggests.

The study focused on the healthy "Mediterranean" diet, a regimen reliant on olive oil, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, with chicken and fish largely replacing red meat. Dairy products and eggs are only used in "low to moderate amounts," accor...

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