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The law on whether or not students in Florida schools will be required to wear masks has changed again.

On Friday the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee reinstated that state's ban on school mask mandates, CBS News reported.

The issue has been in flux since July, when Governor Ron DeSantis signed an executive order barring school districts from requiring...

Los Angeles has become the first major school system in the United States to mandate COVID-19 vaccination for all students 12 and older.

L.A.'s Board of Education voted unanimously Thursday to require all students 12 and older to be vaccinated before they can attend in-person classes, The New York Times reported. The school district is the second largest in the nation, and the m...

New glasses are helping kids in Baltimore see more success in school.

A three-year clinical study found that students who got new eyeglasses through a school-based program had higher reading and math test scores.

"The glasses offered the biggest benefit to the very kids who needed it the most -- the ones who were really struggling in school," said Dr. Megan Collins, a pediatric opht...

School districts in Florida can require their students to wear masks, despite the governor's order blocking mask mandates -- for now at least.

A circuit court judge in Leon County ruled Wednesday that the state can't enforce Gov. Ron DeSantis' ban on school mask mandates,CBS News reported.

"We're not in normal times. We are in a pandemic," said Leon County Circuit Judge...

First comes love. Then comes marriage. Then comes baby in the baby carriage.

While that childhood rhyme used to be true, college-educated women in the United States are now more likely than ever to have a first baby outside marriage. They're also more likely than other women to have a wedding ring by the time they have their second baby.

"It suggests a change in the way that college...

As the new school year begins, teachers can take comfort in a new report that finds they have no greater risk of catching or being hospitalized for severe COVID-19 than anyone else.

Researchers in Scotland say that might be because many schools take precautions that other workplaces don't. It's also possible that the teachers in the study were younger and healthier than other workers, the...

Students face a number of challenges as they head back to school this fall -- from potential exposure to COVID-19 and other illnesses to injuries on the playing field.

"This return to school season is like no other," said Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Schools must be prepared to protect children from COVID-19, while also addressin...

Despite all of the criticism of online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests there was a silver lining: more shut-eye for middle and high school students.

"Without the required transportation time or time required to get ready for school in the morning, online students were able to wake later, and thus get more sleep," said lead author Lisa Meltzer. She is a pediatr...

Even before COVID-19, college could be a challenging experience, but a new study suggests those stresses are much higher for female students.

Still, in the face of a continuing pandemic, all students may need interventions to develop healthy coping strategies, the study authors said.

"They're balancing work, classes, relationships and family -- and then now you're throwing COVID on...

This year of pandemic isolation and anxiety has been tough for many, but an expert says college students are at particularly high risk for mental health issues as they transition from adolescence to adulthood.

As students return to their campuses, it's important for parents to monitor their young adults' mental health, said Dr. Richard Catanzaro, chief of behavioral health at Northern Wes...

Schools are reopening as the Delta variant surges across America, a scary prospect for educators and parents alike.

But experts representing teachers and doctors say reopening must happen for the sake of students, and a combo of vaccination and safety measures will help keep kids and staff safe.

Kids have suffered during the pandemic, and they need in-person schooling this year...

As the school year starts across much of the United States amid a surge in coronavirus cases fueled by the Delta variant, a new survey shows most parents support vaccines for students and staff alike.

Sixty-two percent of nearly 1,700 parents with at least one child aged 7 to 18 said they would feel safer if schools had higher vaccination rates, according to the University of Michigan Hea...

More than $5.8 billion in student loan debt will be erased for over 300,000 Americans who have severe disabilities and low incomes, the Biden administration said Thursday.

"We've heard loud and clear from borrowers with disabilities and advocates about the need for this change and we are excited to follow through on it," Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said in a

  • Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
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  • August 20, 2021
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  • Like it or not, Broward County, Fla., has become a flashpoint for the national debate over reopening public schools in the middle of a COVID-19 surge driven by the highly infectious Delta variant.

    Coronavirus infections claimed the lives of three Broward educators within 24 hours of each other, just as schools are set to reopen next week in the south Florida county.

    The deaths occur...

    Almost 90% of U.S. parents plan to send their kids back to the classroom this fall, but fewer than 60% plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine for those who are old enough, a new poll reveals.

    Anxiety is also high among many parents, who wonder just how safe in-person learning will be as the highly contagious Delta variant spreads nationwide and the pandemic grinds on.

    "To feel safe sending ...

    Here's an unexpected silver lining to the pandemic: New research shows there was a decline in overall drinking and binge drinking among U.S. college freshmen during the early months of the new coronavirus' spread across America.

    "We found that social factors, like social distancing and reductions in social support from friends, were associated with decreases in alcohol use among first-yea...

    In just 24 hours, four teachers in Broward County, Fla., died from COVID-19.

    At least three of the teachers were unvaccinated, CBS News reported.

    "Within a 24-hour span, we had an assistant teacher pass away, a teacher at her school pass away, an elementary teacher pass away and another teacher at a high school," Broward Teachers Union president Anna Fusco told CBS News...

    After a year of learning online in their pajamas at home, many kids may struggle to wake up early for class as schools reopen this fall, an expert says.

    "I think the biggest concern is that the virtual environment of last year led to some unstructured schedules since it did not need a full morning routine that requires waking up early, getting dressed, preparing lunches and transport to s...

    Mandatory COVID-19 vaccination for teachers now has the support of the United States' largest teachers' union.

    "It is clear that the vaccination of those eligible is one of the most effective ways to keep schools safe," Becky Pringle, president of the National Education Association, said Thursday in a statement, The New York Times reported.

    She suggested that teachers who a...

    California on Wednesday became the first state to require teachers and other school staff to provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or else have to undergo weekly tests.

    The announcement, made by Gov. Gavin Newsom, comes...

    If you think the pandemic hasn't taken a toll on the mental health of young people, ponder these two facts from a new review: one in four are suffering from depression, while one in five are struggling with anxiety.

    "Being socially isolated, kept away from their friends, their school routines and extracurricular activities during the pandemic has proven to be difficult on youth," said lea...

    At-home schooling was no vacation for Francis Huang and her 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne Kuo.

    The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote learning upon their family in spring 2020. With it came the stresses now familiar to millions of families. "I think the whole year, we just tried to survive," said Huang, who lives in suburban Dallas.

    In August, they finally leave all that behind, when ...

    Kids may be able to swim their way to a deeper vocabulary.

    That's the takeaway from a study in which researchers taught 48 kids ages 6 to 12 a few new words before they swam, did CrossFit-type exercises or coloring.

    The swimmers did 13% better in follow up tests of the new words -- an outcome that did not surprise study author Madison Pruitt, a former college swimmer who conducted t...

    Higher levels of testosterone don't give men or women an edge in life, claims a new study that challenges a common belief.

    "There's a widespread belief that a person's testosterone can affect where they end up in life. Our results suggest that, despite a lot of mythology surrounding testosterone, its social implication...

    Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

    Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain scientific references than those who don't trust science.

    "We conclude that trust in science, although desirable in m...

    Bullying remains a threat to American teens, and a new study reveals which kids may be at highest risk.

    Race-based bullying takes a heavy toll on teens, the research found, but minority kids who are picked on for other reasons -- whether gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability or immigration status -- suffer a double whammy.

    Victims' physical and mental health suffer a...

    Like many of her peers, Ohio State University engineering student Mary Trabue spent much of the pandemic taking classes online. And she was struggling.

    "I don't know what was wrong, but I just felt tired all the time because I wasn't sleeping," she said. "And I knew I couldn't continue down that path."

    Whether a question of COVID-related depression, anxiety, burnout or all of t...

    Indiana University's mandate that most students be vaccinated in order to attend classes was upheld by a federal judge on Monday in what may be the first such ruling in the United States.

    The decision came in a lawsuit involving eight students who claimed the vaccine requirement violated their right to bodily integrity and autonomy, and that COVID-19 vaccines should not be considered pa...

    The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

    The study, which looked at trends over the past 20 years, found that white men no longer make up the majority of physicians and surgeons in the United States.

    By 2019, they accounted for about 44% of those position...

    If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

    When you're hospitalized, you'll want qualified medical professionals treating you, but does it matter if your doctor is a man or a woman?

    It might.

    A new study in Canada found that patients cared for by female physicians had lower in-hospital death rates than those who had male doctors.

    "Our study overall shows that female doctors have lower patient death rates compared to ...

    There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

    On a 100-p...

    As schools around America begin to prepare for reopening this fall, many states are taking steps to stop public schools from requiring COVID-19 vaccination or proof of vaccination.

    At least seven states -- Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Montana, Oklahoma and Utah -- have already passed such laws, while 34 more have introduced bills that would limit requiring someone to demonstr...

    Want to learn something new? Pick up your pencil.

    New research suggests that despite the ease of using a computer for typing notes or watching videos, people learn certain skills significantly better and faster when writing them by hand.

    "The question out there for parents and educators is, why should our kids spend any time doing handwriting," said senior study author Brenda Rapp, ...

    When schools open their doors this fall, teachers and students who are vaccinated can enter without masks, according to a new guidance issued Friday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The relaxed recommendation comes as a national vaccination campaign in which children as young as 12 can get COVID-19 shots unfolds, accompanied by a general decline in coronavirus hospi...

    Children tend to sleep less as they approach early adolescence, perhaps because of the pressures of homework and the presence of social media.

    Now, new research suggests that loss of precious slumber is not inevitable.

    The researchers found that a school-based program in mindfulness training -- which involves being present in the moment, deep breathing and yoga movements -- helped ...

    Want to hold a preschooler's interest in learning something new? Give them just enough information to make them want to know more, a new study suggests.

    This creates the perfect mix of uncertainty and curiosity in children, said researchers from Rutgers University, in New Jersey.

    "There is an infinite amount of information in the real world," said lead study author Jenn...

    Using a bit of sleight of hand, researchers were able to demonstrate that babies who were the most intrigued with magic tricks became the most curious toddlers.

    The children's early delight in the unexpected could be a sign of their future thinking skills, the researchers said.

    "Something about a baby's curiosity about magic tricks is predicting how curious they become as preschoole...

    Being in a Spanish-speaking home doesn't hamper American kids' ability to learn English, new research shows.

    The first-of-its-kind study included 126 U.S.-born 5-year-olds who were exposed to Spanish at home from birth, along with varying amounts of English.

    Researchers found that the kids not only learn English reliably, their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that...

    Teaching has always been a stressful job, and now a new survey suggests the pandemic could be driving even more teachers from the time-honored profession.

    "Teacher stress was a concern prior to the pandemic and may have only become worse," said study author Elizabeth Steiner, a policy researcher at RAND Corp. "This raises the concern that more teachers may decide to quit this year than in...

    When depression strikes teachers, they can suffer mightily, but a new study suggests their students' ability to learn might also be harmed.

    Researchers found a correlation between teachers' depressive symptoms and math skills in early learners enrolled in Head Start programs. Head Start is a U.S. government program providing early education, nutrition, health and parent support for low-in...

    More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

    Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "Although our analyses demonstrated that t...

    Is too much screen time turning kids off of books?

    New research suggests that's so: Toddlers who regularly spent time on electronic devices -- including tablets, smartphones and TVs -- were less likely to read print books with their parents at age 3. That, in turn, translated to even more screen use by age 5.

    The findings do not prove definitively that early exposure to electronic d...

    Rural school districts in the United States have led the way back to in-person instruction during the pandemic, a survey of school leaders finds.

    About 42% of rural school districts were fully back to in-school learning by February, compared with 17% of urban districts, the survey found.

    The opposite was true for online learning: 29% of urban districts offered fully remote instructi...

    Access to free or low-cost birth control may be an important factor in improving young women's futures, according to new research from Colorado.

    When access to affordable birth control increased, the percentage of young women leaving high school before graduation dropped by double digits, while the rates of pregnancies and abortions also dropped. The study, led by University of Colorado a...

    People may think they know what 'Best before' food date labels mean, but a new study reveals that many consumers misunderstand them.

    The study of over 2,600 U.S. adults "showed that an overwhelming majority of consumers say that they use food date labels to make decisions about food and say they know what the labels mean," said study author Catherine Turvey,. She's from the department of ...

    Adults with autism report a broad range of sexuality -- being much more likely to identify as asexual, bisexual or homosexual than people without autism, a new study finds.

    In a survey of nearly 2,400 adults, researchers found that those with autism were three to nine times more likely to identify as homosexual, asexual or "other."

    Among men, those with autism were over three times ...

    Health care in rural America has become ever more scarce during the coronavirus pandemic, with folks finding it increasingly difficult to find a doctor or get to a hospital.

    For a decade, rural areas have been losing hospitals to financial problems, forcing residents to either drive long distances or shrug their shoulders and forgo needed care.

    Add to that a nationwide shortage of d...

    That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

    Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

    In the new study, researchers asked whether peo...

    Starting the school day a little later helps middle and high school students get more and better sleep, according to a new study.

    The research is based on annual surveys of about 28,000 elementary, middle and high school students and their parents. The surveys were completed before and two years after school start times were changed.

    Changes to sleep cycles during puberty make it ha...