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Results for search "Bowel Problems: Misc.".

Health News Results - 16

The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines appear to be safe for people with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a new study finds.

IBDs -- which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- are chronic conditions caused by an overreactive intestinal immune system, resulting in chronic diarrhea and other digestive symptoms.

In this study, researchers looked at 246 adult IBD patie...

People with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had milder symptoms during the COVID-19 lockdown, possibly due to reduced stress levels and more control over their diet, Argentine researchers report.

"We think the results have something to do with people staying at home," said study author Dr. Juan Pablo Stefanolo. "They were not exposed to outside stress, and at home they were able to avoid f...

When it comes to guarding against colon cancer, what you eat is everything.

You can reduce your risk of colon cancer by eating five food types, an expert says. These include: vegetables; whole grains; legumes; nuts and seeds; and fiber-rich fruit.

"Vegetables contain cancer-preventing nutrients called carotenoids and flavonoids," said Amy Rosenfeld, program coordinator of community ...

Getting a colonoscopy as soon as possible after an abnormal stool test could reduce your risk of colon cancer and death from the disease, researchers say.

In a new study, investigators analyzed data from more than 200,000 U.S. veterans, aged 50 to 75, who had an abnormal fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or fecal occult blood test (FOBT).

Both are common stool blood screening tests. A...

What can poop from ancient Neanderthals tell us?

It turns out that it harbors valuable information about modern-day gut health.

An international research group led by the University of Bologna in Italy analyzed ancient DNA samples extracted from 50,000-year-old sedimentary feces, the oldest sample of fecal material available. They collected the matter in El Salt (Spain), a site wher...

Teens who had asthma and food hypersensitivity when they were younger are at increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), researchers report.

For the study, the investigators examined the health of 2,770 children from birth to age 16. Kids with IBS at age 16 were more likely to have had asthma at age 12 (about 11% versus 7%).

In addition, the researchers found t...

In a first, doctors have used a fecal transplant to treat a rare condition that causes the body to brew its own alcohol.

The disorder, known as auto-brewery syndrome (ABS), occurs when yeast builds up in the gut and converts sugar from food into alcohol. The result is a lot like being drunk: Blood alcohol spikes, causing symptoms such as dizziness, disorientation, coordination problem...

A low-fat, high-fiber diet may improve the quality of life of patients with ulcerative colitis, a new study finds.

"Patients with inflammatory bowel disease always ask us what they should eat to make their symptoms better," said researcher Dr. Maria Abreu. She's a professor of medicine and microbiology and immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

"S...

There isn't enough scientific evidence to support using probiotics to treat most digestive disorders, according to a new American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guideline.

Probiotics are living, microscopic organisms found in foods or dietary supplements, according to the AGA. They include certain bacteria and yeasts.

An estimated 3.9 million American adults have take...

The new coronavirus isn't just attacking the lungs: New research shows it's causing harm to the gastrointestinal tract, especially in more advanced cases of COVID-19.

A variety of imaging scans performed on hospitalized COVID-19 patients showed bowel abnormalities, according to a study published online May 11 in Radiology. Many of the effects were severe and linked with clots a...

Probiotic supplements containing "killed" bacteria might help some people with irritable bowel syndrome find relief, a new study suggests.

Experts said the findings add to evidence that certain probiotics can help some people with irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. And it's the first trial to test a probiotic with bacteria that were heat-killed -- which, the researchers say, could make...

Anal cancer rates have surged in the past 15 years, and the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) may be to blame, a new study suggests.

"What was very shocking to us was that the rate and incidence of anal cancer has increased very fast," said lead researcher Ashish Deshmukh. He's an assistant professor in the department of health services research, management and policy a...

Quitting smoking leads to major changes in intestinal bacteria, according to new research. But just what the changes mean will need further investigation.

The small pilot study, to be presented Monday during the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in Philadelphia, comes in the wake of past research showing a link between bacteria in the gut and cardiovascular health. Tha...

Rising rates of obesity and diabetes could be pushing up rates of pancreatic cancer across the globe, a new report suggests.

Global rates of colon cancer are also on the rise, although fewer cases are now proving deadly, researchers said.

Colon cancer rates and pancreatic cancer deaths rose by 10% worldwide between 1990 and 2017, according to a new study of global trends...

Crohn's disease involves inflammation of the digestive tract. But new research into its causes is focusing on fungi commonly found on the skin.

These microscopic fungi, called Malassezia restricta, are linked to dandruff. They're found in oily skin and scalp follicles, but they also end up in the gut. However, it's not known how they get there or what they do.

The fun...

A simple potty stool under your feet might help cure constipation, researchers say.

"These toilet stools became popular through things like viral videos and social media, but there was really no medical evidence to show whether or not they are effective," said researcher Dr. Peter Stanich. He is an assistant professor of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at Ohio State Univers...