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07 May

Eating A Mediterranean Diet Helps Prevent The Loss Of Brain Function, Study Finds

Following a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and olive oil may protect your brain against protein build-up and shrinkage related to Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

06 May

HealthDay Now: ACP Meeting on Health Wearables and Privacy

Dr. Jacqueline Fincher, president of the American College of Physicians and an internist in rural Georgia, spoke to HealthDay's Mabel Jong about the ACP's focus on privacy concerns at their annual meeting

05 May

ADHD Meds Do Help Preschoolers Control Symptoms, New Study Finds

But one type of ADHD medication appears to have fewer adverse side effects, researchers say

Lots of Sugary Drinks Doubles Younger Women's Colon Cancer Risk: Study

Lots of Sugary Drinks Doubles Younger Women's Colon Cancer Risk: Study

FRIDAY, May 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of colon cancer among young Americans are on the rise, and a new study suggests that drinking too many sugary beverages may be to blame -- at least for women.

Women who drank two or more sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda, fruity drinks or sports and energy drinks per da...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2021
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Gene Tied to Balding May Also Raise COVID Risks for Men

Gene Tied to Balding May Also Raise COVID Risks for Men

It's long been known that COVID-19 is more fatal for men than women, and new research links some of that excess risk to a gene known to cause a form of hair loss in males.

A U.S. team of researchers first suspected the link when they noticed that men with a common form of hormone-sensitive hair loss, known as androgenetic alopecia, were al...

Are You Taking a Med That's Raising Your Blood Pressure?

Are You Taking a Med That's Raising Your Blood Pressure?

FRIDAY, May 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in five Americans with high blood pressure use medications that can cause blood pressure to spike, a preliminary study shows.

The researchers said the findings are concerning, given how many people have difficulty controlling their high blood pressure.

"A large num...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2021
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AHA News: How Social Isolation Can Harm Health as You Age – and How to Prevent It

AHA News: How Social Isolation Can Harm Health as You Age – and How to Prevent It

Barbara Stopfer hasn't had much of a social life since her husband died six years ago. She stopped seeing coworkers, too, after her heart condition required her to cut back her hours and work remotely.

But the 79-year-old stayed connected to people at her residential community for older adults, through activities like mahjong and the occas...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • May 7, 2021
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Poll Finds Many Parents Hesitant to Get Younger Kids Vaccinated

Poll Finds Many Parents Hesitant to Get Younger Kids Vaccinated

As U.S. health officials prepare to authorize Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine for emergency use in younger children, a new poll shows that less than a third of parents would get their child vaccinated as soon as the shots are approved for kids.

Only 29% of parents of children under age 18 said they would get their child vaccinated "right...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • May 7, 2021
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Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that found it can raise blood pressure in kids as young as 5.

Children experienced increases in blood pressure if they had short-term exposure to air polluted with coarser particles or long-term exposure to finer airborne particles, and that also happened with l...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2021
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Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia Risk

Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia Risk

Chronic kidney disease may carry an increased risk of dementia, according to a Swedish study.

In people with chronic kidney disease, the bean-shaped organs gradually lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids.

"Even a mild reduction in kidney function has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular ...

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-trau...

How a Little Alcohol Might Help the Heart

How a Little Alcohol Might Help the Heart

A bit of booze may help protect your heart by reducing stress-related brain activity, a new study suggests.

"The thought is that moderate amounts of alcohol may have effects on the brain that can help you relax, reduce stress levels and, perhaps through these mechanisms, lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease," said lead author Dr. ...

Fear of Losing Health Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs

Fear of Losing Health Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs

Many American workers remain in jobs they'd rather leave -- simply because they don't want to lose their health insurance, a new Gallup poll reveals.

That's the situation for 16% of respondents in a nationwide poll of more than 3,800 adults conducted March 15-21.

The fear is strongest among Black workers. Pollsters found they are mor...

Why Do Dogs Bark & Bite? Fear May Be Key

Why Do Dogs Bark & Bite? Fear May Be Key

That growling dog may actually be terrified of you.

Fear and age-related pain are among the reasons why dogs are aggressive toward people, a new study suggests.

The findings could help two-legged folks better understand and prevent aggressive behavior, such as growling, barking, snapping and biting, according to Finnish researchers.<...

Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

Survivors of the intensive care unit (ICU) have a higher risk of self-harm and suicide after discharge than other hospital patients, a Canadian study shows.

Researchers compared the health records of 423,000 ICU survivors in the province of Ontario with those of with 3 million patients who were hospitalized but not in intensive care betwee...

'BPA-Free' Bottles Might Need a Run Through Your Dishwasher First

'BPA-Free' Bottles Might Need a Run Through Your Dishwasher First

It's a good idea to run drinking bottles you think are BPA-free through the dishwasher several times before using them, a new study suggests.

University of Cincinnati researchers found that some supposedly BPA-free water bottles contain traces of the chemical, which is believed to pose a health risk.

For the study, they analyzed wate...

Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women

Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women

Young Black American women have high rates of lifestyle-related risk factors for heart disease, a new study indicates.

The findings show the need to help them adopt healthy eating and physical activity habits, as well as make it easier for them to access health care, the researchers said.

"Young people should be the healthiest membe...

Race, Neighborhood Affects How Long You'll Live After Heart Attack

Race, Neighborhood Affects How Long You'll Live After Heart Attack

THURSDAY, May 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of dying within five years of a heart attack is notably higher among poor Americans than their wealthier peers, but race also plays a role, a new study reveals.

While Black residents of poor neighborhoods appear to face a higher risk of death than their counterparts in w...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 6, 2021
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Eat Smart: Mediterranean Diet Could Ward Off Dementia

Eat Smart: Mediterranean Diet Could Ward Off Dementia

THURSDAY, May 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A diet rich in vegetables, fruits, olive oil and fish -- the so-called Mediterranean diet -- may protect the brain from plaque buildup and shrinkage, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Germany looked at the link between diet and the proteins amyloid and tau, which are a hallmar...

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 6, 2021
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When Drug Companies Raise Prices, Patients' Out-of-Pocket Costs Rise

When Drug Companies Raise Prices, Patients' Out-of-Pocket Costs Rise

THURSDAY, May 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When prescription drug "list" prices go up, patients often take a hit in the wallet, a new study shows.

Researchers found that while some people are buffered against drug price hikes by their health insurance plan, many are not.

Those in plans that require co-insurance or a...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 6, 2021
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1 in 4 Heart Attacks Arrive With 'Atypical' Symptoms

1 in 4 Heart Attacks Arrive With 'Atypical' Symptoms

A quarter of heart attack patients have atypical symptoms and are less likely to receive emergency care, Danish research reveals.

These patients are also more likely to die within 30 days than those with chest pain.

Atypical heart attack symptoms include breathing problems, extreme exhaustion and abdominal pain.

"Atypical sympt...

Obesity More Deadly for Men Than Women When COVID Strikes

Obesity More Deadly for Men Than Women When COVID Strikes

It's long been known that obesity is a risk factor for severe COVID-19 in infected people. But new research suggests that the connection may be even stronger for men than women.

Researchers at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City analyzed data from more than 3,500 COVID-19 patients admitted to the hospital between early March and Ma...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporters
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  • May 6, 2021
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AHA News: Prenatal Stress Can Program a Child's Brain for Later Health Issues

AHA News: Prenatal Stress Can Program a Child's Brain for Later Health Issues

Soaring blood pressure. A racing heartbeat. Trouble sleeping. Excessive worrying. Difficulty concentrating. These are warning signs of out-of-control stress and anxiety, and their roots could begin long before you might think.

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health issue in the United States, affecting nearly 1 in 5 adults, or...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • May 6, 2021
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