COVID-19 VACCINE NOW AVAILABLE! PLEASE CALL THE PHARMACY TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT!

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Parenting".

28 Jun

1 in 4 Parents Worry Their Child Isn't Reaching Milestones

While the majority of parents worried about their child's development seek advice from healthcare providers, many still turn to the internet or family and friends, researchers say.

Health News Results - 345

FRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Shedding excess weight does much more for the long-term heart health of young people than building muscle, new research suggests.

It's not that gaining muscle while young proved to be a cardiovascular problem. It's just that losing fat offered bigger heart benefits.

"We absolutely still encourage exercise," said study le...

Parents of a child with autism might wonder if a pet cat would be a good fit for the family. Now, research suggests both children with autism and cats benefit when a feline joins the household.

Gretchen Carlisle, a research scientist at the Missouri University Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction, in Columbia, Mo., and her colleagues studied the pet dynamic from both sides.

...

First comes love. Then comes marriage. Then comes baby in the baby carriage.

While that childhood rhyme used to be true, college-educated women in the United States are now more likely than ever to have a first baby outside marriage. They're also more likely than other women to have a wedding ring by the time they have their second baby.

"It suggests a change in the way that college...

Having a special needs child can mean medical emergencies and doctors' visits where parents have to take time off from work, and now a new study shows that can bring a bit financial hit to a family.

Researchers analyzed U.S. government data from more than 14,000 families in that situation and found they lost an average of $18,000 a year in household income in 2016-2017.

"We found a ...

Mothers are known for drying their little ones' tears, sometimes with a hug, a song or a kiss on a scraped knee.

So, perhaps it isn't a surprise that new research shows the sounds of mom's voice provide comfort and even pain relief to the tiniest ones, premature babies.

Researchers from the University of Geneva in Switzerland found that not only did the sound of a mother talking o...

It can happen in an instant. A young child climbs a heavy piece of furniture, and it topples over on the toddler.

New research suggests that's not as rare as you might think: Hundreds of thousands of children have been treated in U.S. emergency rooms for such injuries in recent decades.

"Some families may not think that heavy furniture or TVs can tip over, but they do, and when this...

Schools are reopening as the Delta variant surges across America, a scary prospect for educators and parents alike.

But experts representing teachers and doctors say reopening must happen for the sake of students, and a combo of vaccination and safety measures will help keep kids and staff safe.

Kids have suffered during the pandemic, and they need in-person schooling this year...

As the school year starts across much of the United States amid a surge in coronavirus cases fueled by the Delta variant, a new survey shows most parents support vaccines for students and staff alike.

Sixty-two percent of nearly 1,700 parents with at least one child aged 7 to 18 said they would feel safer if schools had higher vaccination rates, according to the University of Michigan Hea...

Almost 90% of U.S. parents plan to send their kids back to the classroom this fall, but fewer than 60% plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine for those who are old enough, a new poll reveals.

Anxiety is also high among many parents, who wonder just how safe in-person learning will be as the highly contagious Delta variant spreads nationwide and the pandemic grinds on.

"To feel safe sending ...

While breathing in secondhand smoke is known to harm kids' lungs, new research suggests that children whose parents smoked are also more prone to developing rheumatoid arthritis later in life.

"Our findings give more depth and gravity to the negative health consequences of smoking in relation to [rheumatoid arthritis], one of the most common autoimmune diseases," said lead author Dr. Kazu...

Death, injuries, abuse and mental health disorders are among the many harms faced by children whose parents are heavy drinkers, Danish researchers say.

"Within the last 10 years, there has been an expansion of research on consequences that extend beyond the drinker," wrote lead author Julie Brummer, a doctoral student in psychology and behavioral sciences at Aarhus University, Denmark, an...

As doctors see more kids with COVID-19, some positive news has emerged: Only about 4% of children and teens have long-lasting COVID symptoms, a British study finds.

The study confirms that COVID-19 tends to be a mild illness in children and that they usually recover quickly, the researchers reported Aug. 3 in

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • August 5, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • At-home schooling was no vacation for Francis Huang and her 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne Kuo.

    The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote learning upon their family in spring 2020. With it came the stresses now familiar to millions of families. "I think the whole year, we just tried to survive," said Huang, who lives in suburban Dallas.

    In August, they finally leave all that behind, when ...

    U.S. health officials have some reassuring news about the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine in young people: Among millions of U.S. teens who've received Pfizer's shots, serious side effects have been rare.

    As of July 16, close to 9 million teens, aged 12 to 17, had received the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine -- the only one okayed for that age group. Among roughly 9,240 reported side effects, 91% ...

    Having a genetic heart condition often means the end of sports for young athletes, but new research could be a game changer.

    A 20-year study by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that for kids with most genetic heart conditions, the risks of playing sports can be managed through a shared decision-making process.

    The study is a continuation of research on return to play ...

    New research offers some reassuring news for parents of kids returning to school soon: The risk of acquiring COVID-19 on the school bus is very low when proper precautions are taken.

    With open windows, mandated masking and two kids per seat, there was no transmission of the new coronavirus linked to busing even during the height of the pandemic, the study found.

    "Until recently, the...

    As a new school year approaches, U.S. parents are nearly evenly split on whether they'll vaccinate their young kids when a COVID-19 vaccine is approved for their age group, a new survey finds.

    "It's important that parents and providers don't wait for full COVID vaccine approval to begin discussions about vaccination," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital Nati...

    The death of another child between a residential elevator's inner and outer doors had prompted the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to call on Airbnb and other vacation rental ...

    If you're hitting the road with your infant this summer, you need to ensure your child's safety and comfort, a pediatric expert says.

    First, check your car safety seat to make sure it's installed according to the manufacturer's instructions. It needs to be rear-facing and at the correct angle to prevent your infant's head from slumping and potentially blocking the airway, Dr. Dina DiMaggi...

    Before you sign your young pitcher up to play baseball in multiple leagues, familiarize yourself with guidelines that can protect them against overuse injuries.

    Sound obvious? A new survey shows it isn't, because most parents have no idea what those guidelines are.

    Players under age 18 are pitching more and more frequently, often for several teams year-round, which is prompting a ri...

    In yet another finding that illustrates the tragic toll the pandemic has taken on families around the world, a new study shows that 1.5 million children have lost a parent, grandparent or other caregiver to COVID-19.

    "For every two COVID-19 deaths worldwide, one child is left behind to face the death of a parent or caregiver. By April 30, 2021, these 1.5 million children had become the tr...

    If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

    Vaccine advocate Ethan Lindenberger, now 20, had to wait until age 18 to get the vaccinations that he knew he needed to protect his health.

    "I knew growing up my mom was very anti-vaccine. Because of the legal restrictions, I really wasn't trying to fight her on getting me vaccinated," Lindenberger recalled. "She believed vaccines could kill me, and so it was not going to be an easy time....

    The best way to prevent drowning in children and teens is to guard against the danger on multiple fronts, a leading pediatricians' group says.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released its "Prevention of Drowning" report online this week, which notes that about 70% of drowning deaths for U.S. children aged 15 and younger occur between May and August.

    The report includes the ...

    What's the best way to help your young child handle the stress of getting shots? New research claims that perfectly timed encouragement makes all the difference with vaccinations.

    "What we found is that in the first minute after the needle, the more parents said coping-promoting statements, such as, 'You can do this' and 'It will be over soon' or tried to distract them with talking about ...

    Telehealth is increasing in popularity in the United States, partly due to the pandemic. But some children with autism have difficulty sitting through these virtual appointments.

    Yet those visits can be a helpful part of a child's ongoing medical care, and their convenience may help limit time away from work and school, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics' Healthy Children web...

    If you're planning on shooting off fireworks on the 4th of July, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urges you to find other ways to celebrate the holiday.

    "We know that sales of fireworks increased in 2020 as did injuries, so parents and caregivers need to be vigilant this 4th of July, and leave any fireworks to the professionals," Dr. James Dodington, a member of the executive comm...

    Introducing bedtime routines very early in life can improve sleep habits in the toddler years, according to a new study.

    Almost 500 new mothers were first surveyed when their infants were 3 months old. They were questioned again when the children were 12 months, 18 months and 24 months.

    The mothers were asked about their child's sleep habits, including bedtime and wake time...

    The notion of parents picking out genetically perfect babies may seem like science fiction, but bioethicists warn in a new report that some companies have already started to offer couples going through in vitro fertilization (IVF) the means to pick better embryos through polygenic scoring.

    Polygenic scores are a "weighted average of the contributions of all of the genes we have informatio...

    Is spanking good for parents? Is spanking good for kids? Is spanking good for anyone? No, no and no, according to a big new review of prior research.

    "Zero studies found that physical punishment predicted better child behavior over time," said study co-author Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

    She and her t...

    When child care centers were forced to close in the pandemic's early months, hundreds of thousands of American working mothers lost their jobs, new research shows.

    The study is just the latest illustration of the toll the pandemic has taken on working women in the United States.

    Over the first 10 months of the U.S. pandemic, more than 2.3 million women left the labor force, accordin...

    Good news for couples considering fertility treatments: Children born through assisted reproductive technology (ART) don't have an increased risk of cancer, researchers say.

    In the new study, kids born through high-tech fertility treatments -- such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and frozen embryo transfer (FET) -- were followed for 18 years on average.

    The results should be "quite ...

    As babies and toddlers grow, parents may feel excited about their little one learning to crawl, walk or talk.

    But these same milestones can also raise concerns when parents fear their child may not be developing normally. Nearly a quarter of parents -- 23% -- who participated in a new nationwide poll said they had worried that their child had developmental delays.

    Most reached out t...

    As the pandemic eases and children flock to playgrounds this summer, parents need to make sure their kids are safe, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says.

    "After a challenging school year and months of being socially distanced and kept apart from their friends, children are eager to get outside and play," said AAOS spokesperson Dr. Rachel Goldstein. She is a pediatric o...

    Whether to share your bed with your infant at night has been the subject of heated debate: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises against it, recommending room-sharing but not bed-sharing, while others promote the practice as part of an idea called attachment parenting.

    Now, a new study finds bed-sharing did nothing to boost mother-infant bonding.

    "I wanted to study this i...

    Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free -- and they're happy that way.

    The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of parents or people who planned to have children.

    On one h...

    Postpartum depression strikes fathers of premature babies more often than previously thought, and it can linger longer in fathers than in mothers, a new study finds.

    The researchers screened for depression in 431 parents of premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identified depression symptoms in 33% of mothers and 17% of fathers.

    After the babies were brough...

    The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

    Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

    Pool and spa drowning deaths among U.S. children are spiking upwards, and restrictions related to the COVID pandemic may also mean that fewer kids are getting the swimming lessons that might keep them safe, the Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    On average, there were about 400 reported pool/spa drowning deaths among children younger than age 15 each year from 2016 through 2018, ac...

    It's a scenario fraught with potential conflict: Moving back home as an adult can be tough - on both the grown children and their parents.

    But it can also come with opportunities, as long as expectations are established early, say some "boomerang kids" who moved back in with mom and/or dad after reaching adulthood.

    A new study interviewed 31 of those young adults, aged 22 to 31, who...

    Many health experts hailed the recent approval of the Pfizer vaccine for those aged 12 to 15, but some parents have been hesitant to take their kids in for a shot.

    "Parents naturally worry more about their children than they do about themselves -- I think that's parenting defined," said Dr. Hina Talib, a pediatrician and adolescent health specialist at the Children's Hospital at Montefior...

    Is too much screen time turning kids off of books?

    New research suggests that's so: Toddlers who regularly spent time on electronic devices -- including tablets, smartphones and TVs -- were less likely to read print books with their parents at age 3. That, in turn, translated to even more screen use by age 5.

    The findings do not prove definitively that early exposure to electronic d...

    Family history, race and sex are among the factors that increase a child's risk of asthma, a new study shows.

    "These findings help us to better understand what groups of children are most susceptible to asthma early in life," said study co-author Christine Cole Johnson, chair of public health sciences at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

    "We can now use this information to develo...

    Virtual doctor visits for children grew this past year during the pandemic, but a new poll shows U.S. parents are divided on whether they will continue using this option in the future.

    The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan found that about one in five children had a virtual visit with their doctor for check-ups, minor illnesses...

    Early screening for autism can speed up diagnosis and treatment, and now new research shows that pediatricians are more likely to act when parents express concerns.

    According to pediatricians surveyed in the study, only 39% of toddlers who had failed a screening looking for autism signs were then referred to additional expert evaluation.

    "The lack of referral follow-through was beca...

    When the COVID-19 pandemic kept young kids indoors, their time spent watching TV and other screens rose dramatically.

    That's the finding of a new study that investigated the screen time of kindergarteners from low-income families in Ohio. The researchers found that their use of television, video, movies, short clips, and apps or games on any electronic device topped six hours a day in May...

    Heart defects are often - but not always - detected at birth, so it's important to pay attention when a child gets dizzy, passes out or says her heart is "beeping."

    These and other warning signs, such as an apparent change in fitness, shouldn't be overlooked, an expert says.

    Evaluating a child who has these symptoms is important to ensure nothing is missed that could become li...

    As U.S. health officials prepare to authorize Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine for emergency use in younger children, a new poll shows that less than a third of parents would get their child vaccinated as soon as the shots are approved for kids.

    Only 29% of parents of children under age 18 said they would get their child vaccinated "right away," according to data published Thursday by Ka...

    Parents of preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be advised to give their child medication to help them concentrate, sit still and/or control impulsive behaviors.

    A new study comparing two classes of medications might help them arrive at a decision.

    While stimulants are often first in line, the research shows that another class of ADHD drugs known as ...

    Americans' anxiety and concerns about COVID-19 remain high a year into the pandemic, and mental health effects of the health crisis are on the rise, a new survey shows.

    Hispanic (73%) and Black Americans (76%) are more anxious about COVID-19 than white people (59%), according to the American Psychiatric Association (APA) online survey of 1,000 U.S. adults. It was conducted March 26 to Apr...

    Show All Health News Results