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In January, the coronavirus swept through Brian and Maria Padla's family of seven in Philadelphia, starting with their oldest daughter, 16, and then infecting Brian, Maria, and their four younger children.

The virus seemingly came and went without much fanfare for the family. During their two-week-long quarantine, the kids spent a day or two with runny noses and low-grade fevers. Brian an...

For many, it's like emerging suddenly from a long, dark tunnel.

Some people who've been laid low for months by so-called "long haul" symptoms after a coronavirus infection say that within days of getting their COVID-19 vaccine, those symptoms nearly disappeared.

Speaking withThe New York Times, Bridget Hayward, a 51-year-old operating room nurse in Alexandria, Va., said tha...

His second COVID-19 vaccine shot wiped Dr. Greg Poland out.

Poland, 65, said he suffered five hours of shaking chills, fever up to 101 degrees, severe headache, nausea, ringing in his ears and a sore arm after getting his booster dose of the Moderna vaccine.

"I've never had a reaction to a vaccine like that," said Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Ironic...

Most folks infected with COVID-19 will only have mild or moderate illness -- but that means they'll still be stuck at home and feeling really lousy.

What's the best way to cope?

In many ways, you want to behave as you would if you were suffering from a cold or the flu, said infectious disease expert Dr. Aaron Glatt.

"The general good advice we give to people is eat well, make ...

COVID-19 may not be just one disease, but six distinct types, a new British study claims.

Each type differs in severity and in the need for respiratory support during hospitalization, the researchers added.

Cough, fever and loss of smell are the usual symptoms of COVID-19, but the range of symptoms can include headaches, muscle pain, fatigue, diarrhea, confusion, loss of a...

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, many doctors' offices and clinics have made changes to protect patients, care providers and staff.

As an example, here's what's being done at Penn State Health.

"When our patients first call to schedule an appointment at any of our offices, outpatient clinics or centers, they'll be screened for COVID-19," said Dr. Matthew Silvis. He's...

In the thick of the coronavirus pandemic, it might be hard to tell if you've come down with COVID-19, spring allergies or a cold, which all have some similar symptoms.

Fever and dry cough are common symptoms of COVID-19, along with shortness of breath and difficulty breathing, sore throat, diarrhea, fatigue, chills, muscle pain, loss of taste and smell, and body aches.

But i...

The concept is simple, yet elegant: Use fever readings from thermometers to create a database that can show public health officials whether social distancing is curbing the spread of coronavirus.

A San Francisco medical technology company has been doing just that, and the latest news is heartening: The number of fever readings have dipped as Americans stayed at home and away from each...

Coronavirus is officially a pandemic, and Americans are adopting "social distancing" to prevent a surge in potential illnesses and death.

So, what if you run a fever or experience shortness of breath? Should that send you running to an emergency room?

Not necessarily, since most coronavirus cases are mild and there's no need to panic, experts note.

The first...

A new, more toxic strain of strep A bacteria is causing an outbreak of scarlet fever among British children, researchers report.

The upswing in scarlet fever is the biggest seen since the 1960s. Between 2014 and 2016, the number of cases went from 15,000 to more than 19,000. The infection tends to peak between March and May, the study found.

"The new lineage [of strep A] see...

You've probably never heard of Q fever, but the bacterial disease may be sickening -- and killing -- more Americans than once believed, a new study suggests.

Caused by a bacteria carried by livestock, Query (Q) fever is a rare disease first discovered in 1947 and is found mostly in dry, dusty areas of California and the Southwest.

"Q fever is underdiagnosed in the United St...