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Even before signs of Alzheimer's disease or dementia appear, people are prone to make poor financial decisions, a new study finds.

Older people diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer's were more likely to miss credit card payments as early as six years before their diagnosis, compared with similar people without dementia (about 8% versus 7%), the researchers f...

Low-income Black Americans had more job losses, more difficulty getting food and medicine, and higher levels of debt in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic than their white or Hispanic peers, a new study finds.

"Media coverage has focused on the racially disparate effects of COVID-19 as a disease, but we were interested in the socioeconomic effects of the virus, and whether it track...


Americans who lost their jobs this year due to the coronavirus pandemic have remained healthier and more secure thanks to expanded unemployment insurance, a new study reports.

Struggling folks who received benefits reported that they were less likely to go hungry, miss a rent or mortgage payment, delay needed medical care, or suffer from anxiety or depressio...

Black Americans face a heightened risk of stroke, and a new study suggests that abnormalities in the heart's upper chambers play a role.

Experts said the findings, published Nov. 25 in the journal Neurology, point to an under-recognized factor in Black Americans' stroke risk.

It has long been known that in the United States, Black adults are particularly hard-hit by ischemi...

Social and financial struggles are common among Black American cancer survivors and take a heavy toll on their health-related quality of life, according to a new study.

Health-related quality of life among cancer survivors -- how a person perceives their mental, physical and social well-being -- tends to be significantly lower among Black Americans than in other groups.

In this stud...

Colon cancer treatment for low-income Americans has improved with Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, a new study says.

That includes earlier diagnosis, increased access to treatment and better surgical care, according to the researchers.

They compared data for more than 4,400 patients in 19 states that expanded Medicaid in January 2014 and more than 6,000 patients in ...

Air pollution poses a threat to homeless people's mental and physical health, researchers say.

They asked 138 homeless people in Salt Lake City about when and how they knew the air was polluted and how air pollution makes them feel. They also examined their health records.

More than half the people said they'd had physical reactions to air pollution (such as headaches and difficulty...

Patients who survive severe COVID-19 after being hospitalized are not necessarily home-free upon discharge, new research warns.

After tracking outcomes among 1,250 COVID-19 patients for two months after being released from the hospital, investigators found that nearly 7% ultimately died in the weeks following their release, while 15% ended up being readmitted to the hospital. Many others ...

Black and Asian people in the United States and the United Kingdom have significantly higher odds of COVID-19 infection compared to white people, a large research review finds.

The study authors analyzed data from more than 18 million COVID-19 patients who were part of 50 studies published between Dec. 1, 2019 and Aug. 31, 2020.

Compared to white patients, Black patients had twice t...

Working from home during the pandemic significantly reduces your risk of catching COVID-19, U.S. health officials say.

The option to work remotely, however, appears to be available mostly to college-educated white employees with health insurance who make $75,000 a year or more, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

"We have two different kinds of...

The health of low-income women before they become pregnant has improved in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), researchers report.

The time before a woman becomes pregnant is critical for her health and that of her infant, but many poor women don't have health insurance during this important period, the researchers noted.

Their study compared 10 major ...

The loss of a sibling is all too common among young women in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study.

The researchers found that roughly one-third of young women in those countries have experienced the death of a brother or sister by age 25. In several African nations, the rate is as high as 50%.

"There's extensive social science research on family dyn...

Kids growing up in poverty show the effects of being poor as early as age 5 -- especially those who are Black, a new study suggests.

The research adds to mounting evidence that children of Black parents who are also poor face greater health inequities than whites.

"Our findings underscore the pronounced racialized disparities for young children," said lead author Dr. Neal ...

Homeless people are three times more likely to die after a heart attack than other patients, a new study finds.

"Our study shows a dramatically higher rate of mortality after heart attacks in people experiencing homelessness compared to non-homeless patients," said researcher Dr. Samantha Liauw of the University of Toronto. "More research is needed to discover the reasons for this di...

Young women with cancer are at a high risk for employment and financial consequences, a new study finds.

"Our study addresses the burden of employment disruption and financial hardship among young women with cancer -- a group who may be at particular risk for poor financial outcomes after cancer given their age and gender," said researcher Clare Meernik, a fellow at the University of...

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

There's a link between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), financial stress and suicide risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data on ADHD and suicide in Sweden from 2002 to 2015, as well as credit and default data from a random sample of more than 189,000 Swedish adults for the same period.

Before age 30, people with ADHD had only a slightly higher d...

SATURDAY, Oct. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- President Donald Trump was being treated for coronavirus infection at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Saturday, after announcing that he had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday morning.

Trump is struggling with a fever, a cough and nasal congestion, among other symptoms, two officials familiar with his condition told th...

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- President Donald Trump announced early Friday morning that he and his wife, Melania Trump, have tested positive for the coronavirus.

In a tweet sent out at 1 a.m., Trump said they will both quarantine in the White House for an unspecified period of time, The New York Times reported. The diagnosis forces him to temporarily withdraw from...

Coronavirus infections are surging in the American heartland, with Wisconsin bearing the brunt of COVID-19's relentless spread.

Many Midwestern states are seeing some of the nation's highest per capita rates of infection, and while federal health officials have again urged some governors in the region to require masks statewide, some Republican governors have resisted, the Associat...

In rural America, drinking has become particularly deadly for many, a new government report shows.

Deaths related to alcohol use in those regions rose 43% between 2006 and 2018, health officials reported.

Over that time, the rate of deaths went from 11 per 100,000 people to 15 per 100,000. Also, the rate of deaths among women more than doubled, according to researchers ...

More than 60% of households with children in the United States have struggled with serious financial problems during the coronavirus pandemic, a new poll shows.

Black and Hispanic households with children have borne the brunt of the hardships, which include struggles to afford medical care, depletion of household savings and difficulty paying debts, the poll found.

Cond...

Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian areas of Ohio than in other rural parts of the state, new research shows.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 11 years of Medicare data, ending in 2017, and found that Alzheimer's rates were 2% to 3% higher in rural Appalachian counties than in other rural counties in Ohio.

The study, published online rece...

As millions of people struggle with economic hardships during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study shows that financial stressors may make people up to 20 times more likely to attempt suicide.

The research suggests that mental health providers should consider financial problems when deciding how best to help those who are hurting.

"We studied past homelessness, unemployment...

Lifestyle interventions can help people lose weight, but experts have worried whether such programs can work in low-income communities where obesity rates can be high and access to health care can be limited.

Until now.

A new study found that when these programs are made accessible, meaningful weight loss can be achieved.

The research team, led by Peter Katzmarzy...

Being a selfish jerk won't pave a path to success, new research suggests.

The study involved hundreds of participants who completed personality assessments when they were undergraduates or MBA students at three universities.

The researchers checked in with the same people about 14 years later to find out how well they'd done in their careers, and their co-workers were asked ...

More than two in five working-age U.S. adults didn't have stable health insurance in the first half of 2020, while more than one-third struggled with medical bills, according to a new survey.

"The survey shows a persistent vulnerability among U.S. working-age adults in their ability to afford coverage and health care. That vulnerability could worsen if the COVID-19 pandemic and relat...

Eating disorders -- such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder -- cost the U.S. economy nearly $65 billion in one recent year, a new report shows.

About 75% of that ($48.6 billion) was due to lost productivity, according to the researchers.

"Our study lays bare the devastating economic impact that eating disorders have in the United States, a country whe...

People with diabetes face a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19, but a new survey reports they have also suffered more economic fallout from the pandemic.

In June, 18% of people with diabetes were out of work compared to 12% of the general population. And one-third of people with diabetes have lost at least some income since the pandemic began versus about 2...

Does your income determine your ability to practice social distancing?

New research suggests that's so: Richer communities have been more likely to stay home during the pandemic than poorer ones, according to scientists from the University of California, Davis.

For the study, they used data from mobile location devices between January and April 2020 and found that social d...

The coronavirus pandemic has fueled big increases in video visits between patients and doctors, but older Americans haven't easily taken to the trend, a new study finds.

More than one-third of those over 65 face difficulties seeing their doctor via telemedicine -- especially older men in remote or rural areas who are poor, have disabilities or are in poor health.

"Telemedi...

High blood pressure is often seen as a condition of old age, but a new study finds that it's common among young Americans -- especially young Black adults.

The study, of 18- to 44-year-olds in the United States, found that high blood pressure was prevalent across all racial groups: Among both white and Mexican American participants, 22% had the condition.

But young Black...

With everyday life turned upside down, efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are taking a toll on the well-being and health of American families, a new poll reveals.

More than 1,000 parents nationwide were surveyed in early June.

"Without question, COVID-19 had a sudden and profound effect on families nationwide," said survey leader Dr. Stephen Patrick. He's director of...

The COVID-19 pandemic has America's hospitals on the fiscal ropes, with many facing financial ruin without continued aid from the federal government, a new report predicts.

Average hospital margins across the nation could sink to −7% in the second half of 2020 without further help, with half of all hospitals potentially operating in the red, the American Hospital Association...

The world's population is shifting, with a new analysis predicting it will peak in 2064 at around 9.7 billion people and fall to 8.8 billion by the end of the century.

The United States will have population growth until just after mid-century (364 million in 2062). That will be followed by a moderate decline to 336 million by 2100. At that point it would be the fourth most populous co...

Missing lots of school between kindergarten and eighth grade may have consequences when kids grow up, a new study suggests.

When they reached their early 20s, frequent absentees were less likely to vote and more likely to have economic problems and poor educational outcomes, researchers found.

The results suggest early school absenteeism should be taken seriously.

...

Early-stage breast cancer is more likely to be diagnosed in U.S. states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under Obamacare than in those that haven't, researchers say.

Their new study looked at a database of more than 71,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in 31 states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act and 14 states that did not.

In the expan...

COVID-19 is being diagnosed in Hispanic communities at a disproportionately high rate, a new study of the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., area shows.

Researchers found that among nearly 38,000 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 at Johns Hopkins Health System, 16% were positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

That figure was much higher -- almost 43% -- among Hispanic pat...

Working at home during a pandemic isn't an option for about three-quarters of U.S. workers, putting them at increased risk of infection, a new study finds.

Those 108 million workers tend to be among the lowest paid and are more likely to face pandemic-related job disruptions, including layoffs, furloughs or reduced hours.

"This pandemic has really exacerbated existing vulner...

More than 2 million Americans buy prescription drugs from other countries as a way around rising prices in the United States, a new study finds.

The analysis of nationwide survey data showed that 1.5% of adults got their prescription meds from outside the United States between 2015 and 2017.

Immigrants and people who were older or who had inadequate health insurance cov...

Huge declines in patient visits during the coronavirus pandemic have slashed U.S. primary care doctors' revenues, a new study finds.

As a result of decreases in office visits and fees for services from March to May during the pandemic, a full-time primary care physician will lose an average of more than $65,000 in revenue in 2020.

Overall, primary care practices nationwide s...

Not only have women been more likely than men to lose their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic, but they are also shouldering more child care responsibilities at home, new research shows.

Overall, employment among women dropped 13 percentage points between March and early April -- from 59% to 46% -- while male employment dropped 10 percentage points -- from 64% to 54%...

Smoking, drinking too much and divorce are among the social and behavioral factors most strongly linked to dying early, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 13,600 U.S. adults between 1992 and 2008, and examined 57 social and behavioral factors among those who died between 2008 and 2014.

The 10 factors most closely linked with dying were: being a curren...

Furloughs and layoffs stemming from the coronavirus pandemic have left many Americans without health insurance, a new survey reveals.

"Here in the fourth month of COVID-19-related job losses, a growing number of people won't be able to afford health care in the midst of the worst public health crisis in modern times," said report author Sara Collins, vice president for health care cov...

COVID-19 is taking a heavy toll on Americans' mental health, a new nationwide survey shows.

Overall, psychological distress more than tripled between 2018 and this spring -- from 4% of U.S. adults in 2018 to 14% in April.

Beth McGinty, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, said the findings, from a survey of 1,500 a...

A cancer diagnosis can deliver a double blow -- along with dealing with a serious health crisis, you also need to worry about how your treatment is going to affect your finances.

Nearly three out of four people with advanced colon cancer that spread to other parts of their bodies experienced major financial hardships within a year of starting treatment, a new study found.

...

Fatter wallets lead to fatter people, according to a new study.

Researchers examined the link between nations' wealth and their obesity rates. They discovered citizens get plumper as their country gets richer.

"As most people currently live in low- and middle-income countries with rising incomes, our findings underscore the urgent need for effective policies to break -- or a...

If there's such a thing as a "new normal" during the coronavirus pandemic, it's a constant state of stress.

And it's particularly intense for many parents who are keeping house, working from home, and trying to keep their kids' online learning on track at the same time, according to a new online survey.

Nearly half (46%) of respondents who have kids younger than 18 said ...

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

COVID-19 has directly claimed tens of thousands of U.S. lives, but conditions stemming from the novel coronavirus -- rampant unemployment, isolation and an uncertain future -- could lead to 75,000 deaths from drug or alcohol abuse and suicide, new research suggests.

Deaths from these causes are known as "deaths of despair." And the COVID-19 pandemic may be accelerating conditions that...