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Results for search "Diabetes: Misc.".

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TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have used a transplant procedure to apparently cure diabetes in lab mice, without the need for immune-suppressing drugs afterward.

The success is a first step in developing a safer way to use cell transplants to possibly cure type 1 diabetes. But that's a long way off, researchers said — and findings in mice often f...

Dental coverage under Medicare could soon start expanding for seniors under a new proposal from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

Still, the proposed rules would not provide full coverage for regular dental care, which has been explicitly excluded from Medicare since...

The earlier a woman is diagnosed with diabetes, the sooner she may enter menopause, new research shows.

Rates of diabetes have grown steadily, so researchers wanted to understand the long-term implications of

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • Every year, hibernating bears are able to feast, pack on a huge amount of weight and then lie around for months -- all without suffering the health consequence of diabetes. Now researchers are closer to understanding their secret.

    Scientists with the Washington State University Bear Center say they've zeroed in on eight proteins that appear key to keeping hibernating grizzlies diabetes-pr...

    Using a lower threshold to diagnose pregnancy-related diabetes does not seem to reduce the risk of having a big baby, on average — but some women do benefit, a new clinical trial suggests.

    Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when a pregnant woman's blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The condition can h...

    Elevated levels of a specific protein appear to be linked to an increased risk of developing diabetes and dying from cancer, a new study finds.

    High levels of prostasin -- mainly found in epithelial cells, which line the surfaces and organs of the body -- are associated with both

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • Living in a region where tropical storms, hurricanes or other weather emergencies are likely means being ready for a quick evacuation.

    "Part of preparedness is having a plan," said Dr. James McDeavitt, executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "You don't want to make that plan as the hurricane is barreling down the coast. You need to <...

    In a mix of bad and good news, a new large study confirms that COVID can raise the risks of new-onset heart trouble and diabetes -- though those threats typically wane again after a few months.

    The study, of nearly 430,000 British COVID patients, found that the risks of suffering a

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 20, 2022
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  • An off-brand medication for diabetic macular edema might prove just as effective in early treatment as its more expensive alternative, potentially saving patients thousands of dollars, new research suggests.

    The vision condition is a common complication of poorly controlled diabetes, which can damage bl...

    California Governor Gavin Newsom announced Thursday that the state will spend $100 million to produce its own insulin.

    The innovative push comes after years of astronomical prices for the drug have made it nearly impossible for many people with diabetes to a...

    More disability payments led to fewer hospitalizations for Vietnam veterans with diabetes, according to a new report.

    The research looked at 14,000 Vietnam vets who benefited...

    Keeping your bedroom dark not only helps you get a good night's sleep, but may significantly lower your odds of developing three major health problems, a new study suggests.

    Older men and women who used night lights, or left their TV, smartphone or tablet on in the room were more likely to be obese, and have high blood pressure and diabetes, compared with adults who were not exposed to an...

    A form of diabetes caused by malnutrition is significantly different from type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be considered a distinct form of the disease, a new study says.

    The findings may prove crucial in developing effective treatme...

    Diabetes increases the odds that a COVID-19 infection will be severe, and folks with diabetes may be up to four times more likely to develop long-lasting symptoms, new research suggests.

    "Though more data is needed, some early studies suggest that diabetes may be a risk factor for long COVID, and thus careful monitoring of people with diabetes for development of long COVID may be advised,...

    Dementia risk factors appear to shift with age, and experts say knowing that could help people make lifestyle changes to reduce their chances of developing the disease.

    "Dementia is a complicated disease and risk prediction scores need to b...

    If you're a young adult with prediabetes, you may already know you have a greater than average risk of full-blown diabetes. But you could also be at increased risk for a heart attack, new research shows.

    "After taking into account various influencing and modifying factors, we found that young adults with prediabetes had 1.7 times higher chances of being hospitalized for a heart attack com...

    Your chances of dying or having severe complications from COVID-19 are much higher if you're unvaccinated and have heart problems or heart disease risk factors, researchers warn.

    In a new study, British investigators analyzed 110 previous COVID-19 studies that included a total of nearly 49,000 unvaccinated patients.

    The researchers found that unvaccinated people with evidence of he...

    College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

    Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

    A new therapy corrects low blood sugar in children with a genetic disorder that causes the pancreas to produce too much insulin, researchers say.

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) is the most common cause of...

    People who sleep with a light on may be unwittingly keeping their nervous system awake, a small study suggests.

    The study of 20 healthy adults found that just one night of sleeping with the lights on spurred changes in people's functioning: Their heart rates stayed higher during sleep compared to a night with l...

    Feel free to open a bottle of your favorite vintage: If you time it right, a little wine might help guard against type 2 diabetes.

    A new study suggests that a small glass with dinner may lower the chances of being diagnosed with the blood sugar disease.

    Exactly how small? About half an ounce of wine for wom...

    Although there's been a marked decline in rates of stroke among older adults over the past 30 years, growing numbers of young Americans are having strokes.

    Obesity may be one reason why, experts say.

    "The decline in strokes in people aged 50 and older is likely due to better stroke risk factor control, such as...

    Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

    If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

    "Our projections are based on an additional 10 minutes of moderate to vi...

    When older people cut back on physical activity, their risk of type 2 diabetes rises. But walking regularly can help, a new study suggests.

    The more steps you take -- and the more intensely you walk -- the lower your odds for type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

    To assess the link between walking and diabetes risk...

    Worrying can take a toll on your psyche, but new research suggests that when middle-aged men fret too much, they face a higher risk for developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke down the road.

    And this increase in risk is on par with the health risks linked to heavy drinking, the findings showed.

    <...

    Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.

    Four specific factors -- higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms -- at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

    "Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel So...

    What's good for the heart is good for the brain, and a new study suggests that connection might be especially critical for women.

    The study, of more than 1,800 adults in their 50s and 60s, found that those with heart disease, or risk factors for it, generally showed a greater decline in their memory and thinking skills over time.

    That was not a surprise, since past studies have reve...

    Scientists have known for 100 years that insulin is the body's main mechanism for controlling blood sugar levels, but researchers have now discovered a second hormone does the same job a bit differently -- and they say it could be a new target for treating diabetes.

    The hormone, called FGF1, is produced in the body's fat tissue. Like

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 5, 2022
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  • A leading medical group has updated a guideline for treating pain and numbness caused by diabetes.

    The problems, which affect the hands and feet, are the result of nerve damage, also known as diabetic neuropathy. The new guideline from the Ame...

    Gum disease isn't just a threat to your teeth. It also increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, mental woes and more, British researchers report.

    "The study reinforces the importance of prevention, early identification and treatment of periodontal disease, and the need for members of th...

    Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 -- deaths that are considered "premature."

    The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

    According to new research, people with psychiatric disorders often have to deal with another trouble: Higher rates of type 2 diabetes than the general population.

    "Increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes among individuals with a psychiatric disorder suggests that these conditions have a shared vulnerability," the Danish researchers said.

    In the study, the investigators searched four...

    Low-dose aspirin neither reduces nor increases the risk of dementia in adults with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds.

    "This is reassuring that an increase in the risk of dementia is unlikely for the millions of people worldwide who regularly take aspirin to protect against the risk of heart attack and stroke," according to study author Jane Armitage, of the University of Oxford in Englan...

    If they have diabetes, people with atrial fibrillation (a-fib) are less likely to notice symptoms of the common heart rhythm disorder. They also tend to have a higher risk of serious complications, a new study finds.

    "It is remarkable to find that patients with diabetes had a reduced recognition of atrial fibrillation symptoms," said study co-author Dr. Tobias Reichlin, a professor of car...

    Young, Black Americans are experiencing significant spikes in obesity, type 2 diabetes and smoking, all risk factors for heart attack and stroke.

    Between 2007 and 2017 -- before the COVID-19 pandemic and the concerns it has created -- hospitalized Black Americans aged 18 to 44 had sharp increases in these risks. They were also having higher rates of health complications and poor hospital ...

    All body fat is not the same.

    And a new study suggests that folks who have more of what's known as brown fat may have a lower risk of weight-related health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

    "Brown fat has long been thought to benefit metabolism because, unlike the much more common white storage...

    Managing your diabetes can be tough, but your eyes might thank you for it.

    Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that damages the retina's blood vessels, often resulting in vision loss and blindness. The condition occurs in more than half of people with diabetes.

    It affects nearly 8 million Americans and that number is expected to double by 2050, according to an Ameri...

    The number of people experiencing numbness, pins and needles, and burning pain in their feet and toes seems to be on the rise, new research suggests, and some of these folks may be at increased risk for heart trouble.

    Exactly why there has been an uptick in "small fiber neuropathy" is not fully understood yet, but it could be due to the ongoing diabetes and obesity epidemic as both condit...

    In his work with patients who have pancreatic cancer, Dr. Srinivas Gaddam was bothered by something that he was seeing.

    "There are some patients that you can't stop thinking about because they've left a mark on you and you try your best to turn things around, but there's only so much you can do," said Gaddam, who said he had found himself caring for a few patients who were very young.

    Liver disease is usually associated with alcoholism or hepatitis, but obesity and diabetes are becoming an even more dire threat for potentially fatal liver damage, a new study reveals.

    In fact, advanced fatty liver disease increases a person's risk of death by nearly sevenfold, according to a new report.

    But it's a silent killer -- by the time you develop symptoms related to fatty...

    Statins are proven to lower cholesterol, but they may also come with a downside for patients with diabetes: A new study finds they may make the blood sugar disease worse.

    Researchers found that among those taking statins, 56% saw their diabetes progress, compared with 48% of those not taking statins. And the higher the dose of the statin, the faster the progression of the diabetes.

    ...

    Type 2 diabetes may up the risk for Alzheimer's disease by altering brain function, new animal research suggests.

    A University of Nevada Las Vegas team showed that chronically high blood sugar could impair memory and alter aspects of working memory networks in rodents.

    "Diabetes is a major risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease, but it is not clear why," said study author Ja...

    For people with diabetes who have a stroke, there may be an ideal blood sugar target to prevent another one or a heart attack, a South Korean study finds.

    To determine average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months, the study team used the hemoglobin A1C test.

    "We know that having diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of having a first stroke," said study a...

    A drug widely used to treat osteoporosis might reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

    Taking the drug alendronate (Fosamax) for at least eight years could potentially reduce a person's risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half, compared to people never prescribed the drug, according to findings presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the S...

    In terms of healthy eating, timing is everything.

    That's the word from researchers who claim the time of day that you eat may be just as important for your health as what you eat.

    Having your meals in a consistent window of 8 to 10 hours may help prevent and manage chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, according to the authors of a new study published online Sept. 22...

    Insulin resistance can make you more than twice as likely to develop major depression, even if you haven't developed full-blown diabetes, a new study reports.

    Initially healthy people who later developed prediabetes were 2.6 times more likely to come down with major depression during a nine-year follow-up period, according to the findings.

    "The insulin-resistant folks had two to thr...

    Treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) -- the most common hormone disorder in women of child-bearing age -- is costly.

    In 2020, diagnosing and treating this disorder cost an estimated $8 billion in the United States, according to a new economic ana...

    Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

    Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

    The new stu...

    Black Americans and Mexican Americans typically develop type 2 diabetes up to seven years earlier than their white counterparts, a new study finds.

    In all, more than 25% of adults in the two groups reported being diagnosed with diabetes before age 40, and 20% didn't know they had the disease.

    Researchers said the findings highlight the need to address economic and social conditions ...

    The recommended age to start screening overweight and obese people for diabetes will be lowered by five years from 40 to 35, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has announced.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has decided an earlier five years of testing could help detect more people who have prediabetes, said Dr. Michael Barry, vice chair of the USPSTF....

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