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14 Apr

Should Indoor Tanning Beds Be Banned For Teens?

A universal ban on indoor tanning for teens would prevent more than 15,000 cases of deadly melanoma, researchers say.

Health News Results - 53

Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

"Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

Here are some of her tips:

  • Wear a sunscreen with SPF ...

THURSDAY, July 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' overall death rate from cancer continues to fall -- but rising rates of certain cancers and ongoing racial disparities linger.

Those are among the findings of an annual report to the nation from several major cancer organizations.

The good news includes an accelerating decline in the overall cancer death rate, ...

Sunscreen isn't just for pool gatherings and beach outings: Using sunscreen every day could reduce your risk of skin cancer, experts say.

Daily use of at least an SPF 15 sunscreen can lower your risk of melanoma — the deadliest type of skin cancer — by 50%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

If you spend most of your day indoors, SPF 15 should provide adequate protection,...

It's long been known the sun's rays can cause skin cancer.

But a new poll shows that only about 30% of American adults say they're concerned about developing skin cancer -- even though nearly 70% have at least one risk factor for the disease.

The American Academy of Dermatology's survey found that 49% of respondents were more worried about avoiding sunburn than preventing skin cance...

Think you know all you need to know about slathering on the sunscreen this summer?

Maybe you don't.

As the Memorial Day weekend begins, many Americans are confused about the proper application of sunscreen and about its sun protection factor (SPF), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says.

A recent academy poll of 1,000 U.S. adults found that while 80% know they should a...

When checking your body for signs of skin cancer, don't overlook your nails.

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) points out that skin cancer -- including melanoma, the deadliest type -- can develop under and around the fingernails and toenails. Though it's rare, it's more common in older people with darker skin.

Risk factors include personal or family history of melanoma or na...

You might think everybody knows how to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays, but a new survey reveals that one-third of Americans lack a basic understanding of sun safety and skin cancer.

That's the surprising takeaway from an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey of 1,000 U.S. adults.

Fifty-three percent of respondents didn't realize shade offers protection from t...

A cutting-edge experimental drug cuts nearly in half the risk of death among patients with a rare but aggressive cancer of the eye, new clinical trial data show.

Tebentafusp has now become the first drug shown to improve overall survival in patients with uveal melanoma, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, immediate past president of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), in a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2021
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  • A U.S.-wide ban on teen use of tanning beds would prevent thousands of cases of skin cancer and save millions in health care costs, researchers say.

    Indoor tanning has been linked to an increased risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- and the highest risk is among people who start using tanning beds at a young age. Despite that danger, many U.S. teens do.

    While ban...

    Most people are familiar with common sun-protection advice, from wearing and reapplying sunscreen to putting on a hat.

    But a new Canadian study finds that for people who take certain blood pressure medications, that advice becomes even more critical because those drugs can increase their sensitivity to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

    The researchers reviewed data for nearly...

    At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

    Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the lates...

    Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

    The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

    On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

    A majority of dermatology patients are happy with telehealth appointments in place of in-person office visits, a new study finds.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many medical specialties to move from in-person to online appointments, but dermatology had already seen increased use of telehealth visits over the last decade, according to the George Washington (GW) University researchers.

    Giving melanoma patients a "personalized" vaccine can prompt an anti-tumor immune response that lasts for years, an early study finds.

    The study involved just eight patients with advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

    But it builds on earlier work showing it is possible to spur the immune system to respond to an individual's unique tumor.

    All eight patients unde...

    Researchers from two universities in Utah have a warning for students planning to hit the slopes or play in the snow without sunscreen: You could greatly increase your risk of skin cancer.

    A survey of students by Brigham Young University College of Nursing in Provo found that only 9% use sunscreen. They also found students' use of tanning beds surges in winter, especially among men.

    Young women who regularly visit tanning salons may have an increased risk of developing endometriosis, a new study suggests.

    Researchers said the findings, from a large study of U.S. women, don't prove that tanning beds help cause the painful pelvic condition.

    But, they noted, the study might give women more incentive to avoid indoor tanning.

    Endometriosis is a condition in wh...

    DNA mutations in skin cells may signal a risk for melanoma long before it's visible to the eye, a new study suggests.

    Exposure to sun damages skin and DNA, and this damage can be measured. Using a new method for analyzing DNA harm, researchers say they can estimate the risk of developing melanoma.

    "It turns out that a multitude of individual cells in so-called normal skin ...

    Nearly 90,000 Americans between 15 and 39 years of age will be diagnosed with cancer this year and more than 9,200 will die, a new report projects.

    One hematologist who deals with younger cancer patients said the shock of a diagnosis at this point in their lives can be overwhelming.

    "This population is unique, they're in the prime of their lives," said Dr. Tina Bhatnagar, w...

    Blood pressure drugs don't increase the risk of cancer, according to the largest study to examine the issue.

    A possible link between blood pressure drugs and cancer has been the subject of debate for decades, but evidence has been inconsistent and conflicting.

    For this study, researchers analyzed data from 31 clinical trials of blood pressure drugs that involved 260,000 peop...

    Black Americans with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, wait longer for surgery than white patients, a new study finds.

    "We already knew that black patients with melanoma have a worse prognosis and that longer time to treatment is associated with worse survival, but we didn't fully understand the relationship between race and time to treatment after controlling for various o...

    Headed to the beach or park for a little fresh air? Don't forget your sun protection, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises.

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans, but many don't protect themselves from harmful UV rays.

    Sixty percent of respondents to an AAD survey said they had had such a bad sunburn their ...

    With many beaches and parks opening in time for Memorial Day, the American Cancer Society is reminding people to practice sun safety.

    Overexposing yourself to the sun increases your risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, with almost 5.5 million cases each year. That's more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.

    "COVID-19 ...

    The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay.

    A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles.

    "We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being de...

    Though most Americans are well aware that protecting themselves from sunburn is important, many don't take precautions, a new survey finds.

    Protecting yourself from exposure to sunlight is the best way of preventing skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

    The results of the AAD survey show that 76% of Americans know the importance of sun pr...

    New treatments for melanoma have dramatically reduced deaths from this often fatal skin cancer.

    Leaders of a new study report that the death rate from aggressive melanoma that spread to other organs plummeted 18% between 2013 and 2016, after jumping 7.5% between 1986 and 2013. The figures apply to white Americans, the group that accounts for nearly all cases of melanoma in th...

    People whose spouse or partner has died are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma, but more likely to die from it, a new study says.

    An analysis of data from population-based studies conducted in the United Kingdom and Denmark between 1997 and 2017 found that people who had lost a spouse or partner were 12% less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma than others.

    But b...

    Gay and bisexual men in the United States have higher skin cancer rates than heterosexual men, while bisexual women have lower rates than heterosexual women, according to a new study.

    Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston analyzed data culled from national surveys conducted from 2014 to 2018 and found that skin cancer rates were 8.1% among gay men, 8.4% among...

    Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds.

    "Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.

    She and her colleagues from the University of Utah ...

    The chemicals in sunscreens help shield people from the sun's rays, but they are also absorbed into the body at levels that raise some safety questions, a new study confirms.

    The study, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a follow-up to a 2019 investigation. Both reached the same conclusion: The active ingredients in popular sunscreens can be absorbed into the blood at ...

    A 29% drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to the latest American Cancer Society (ACS) annual report.

    Cancer deaths in the United States fell 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest-ever single-year decrease.

    That record drop was spurred by a rapid decl...

    Weight-loss surgery does more than shed pounds: new research suggests it might also lower your risk for skin cancer.

    "This provides further evidence for a connection between obesity and malignant skin cancer, and for the view that we should regard obesity as a risk factor for these forms of cancer," said investigator Magdalena Taube. She's a researcher in molecular and clinical medici...

    Widely condemned for driving up skin cancer risk, tanning beds remain common in that shrine to healthy living: gyms.

    That's the finding from a study of tanning beds in three of America's six largest gym chains: Anytime Fitness, Planet Fitness and Gold's Gym.

    Collectively, they operate more than 1,900 branches in the areas included in the study (33 states and Washington, D.C....

    Using herbal products to treat breast cancer that's spread to the skin could slow wound healing and interfere with chemotherapy or hormone treatment, an expert warns.

    Many patients try herbal products and creams to treat these skin lesions, according to Dr. Maria Joao Cardoso, head breast surgeon at Champalimaud Cancer Center in Lisbon, Portugal.

    "There are many of these the...

    Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is recovering in a Georgia hospital after he broke his pelvis in a fall at his home on Monday night.

    "He has been admitted to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture," said a statement issued early Tuesday by The Carter Center. "He is in good spirits and is looking forward to recovering at home."

    <...

    Melanoma is the most lethal type of skin cancer, and a new study finds that the diagnosis of a suspect lesion gains accuracy when a specialist pathologist is brought on board.

    Many patients with melanoma are first diagnosed by general practitioners, dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A biopsy sample of the suspect lesion might then be sent to a general pathologist for further diagnos...

    Cases of deadly melanomas on the head and neck rose more than 51% over two decades among young people in the United States and Canada, a new study reports.

    Researchers found that the incidence of head and neck melanoma rose nearly 4% a year from 1995 to 2001, and 1.2% a year from 2001 to 2014 in children and young adults.

    Using data from a North American cancer r...

    Wondering if you can do more than slap on some sunscreen to prevent skin cancer? A new study suggests that getting more vitamin A may help.

    The study of around 125,000 Americans found that people with the highest intake of vitamin A lowered their risk of squamous cell skin cancer by around 15%. Most of the vitamin A they consumed came from foods.

    "These findings just ...

    Don't invite skin cancer to your holiday weekend.

    As you celebrate America's independence at beaches, pools or backyard parties, remember that the sun's damaging rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. -- and protecting yourself is a must.

    "When it comes to sunscreen, people in general don't put on enough, and they don't put it on as often as they should," said Dr. William...

    When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

    Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

    Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is normally invisible to the naked eye.

    "T...

    Monitoring a melanoma patient's progress is challenging. But a laser-based test might allow doctors to quickly screen the patient's blood to spot tumor cells roaming the body, a preliminary study suggests.

    Those cells, known as circulating tumor cells, are "shed" from the original cancer site into the blood vessels or lymph system. They are considered a potential red flag. They could ...

    Whether you're at the beach, the park or a pool this summer, be sure to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, and most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to the American Cancer Society.

    "Fortunately, everyone can take action to protect their s...

    Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

    Researchers found that only about one-third of homemade sunscreens on the popular information-sharing website Pinterest specified how much sun protection factor (SPF) each "natural" sunblock contained. In some cases, SPF content dipped as low as 2 -- far bel...

    For all of those men who view a mustache as a largely ornamental addition to their masculine appearance, a new study reveals it can also guard against lip cancer.

    "Mustaches seem to protect the lip the same way that hair protects the scalp," explained study author Dr. Daniel Aires. He is director of dermatology with the University of Kansas Health System. ...

    The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game.

    "I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor.

    Within days, Langill was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma -- an advanced stage of the mos...

    Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found.

    Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers.

    One in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer a...

    For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.

    Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test subjects applied spray, lotion and cream...

    Even though many moisturizers now contain sunscreens, people may not put them on their faces as carefully as they do sunscreen lotions, new research suggests.

    "Moisturizer is not as well applied as sunscreen," said lead author Kevin Hamill, a lecturer in eye and vision science at the University of Liverpool in England.

    "Therefore, if planning prolonged sun exposure, we advis...

    Tens of millions of Americans develop sun-linked skin lesions called actinic keratoses, which are tied to later cancer risk.

    Many will get a combo of treatments to help clear the blemishes.

    Now, research shows that the same two-ointment combo -- one used to ward off skin cancer and the other a psoriasis drug -- also greatly reduce the odds for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs)...

    A healthy diet may trigger a better response to a certain kind of melanoma treatment.

    How?

    New research suggests that a diet that's full of fiber appears to lead to more diverse intestinal bacteria (microbiome). In turn, a thriving gut microbiome is linked to a stronger response to an immune therapy for the aggressive skin cancer.

    "We found that patients eating a ...

    For people with the deadly skin cancer melanoma, one dose of the drug Keytruda before surgery might stop the cancer in its tracks, according to a groundbreaking new study.

    Keytruda (pembrolizumab) is a PD-1 inhibitor, an immunotherapy drug that triggers the body's immune response to attack cancer cells. According to results of this study, the drug's effects peak as early as seven days...

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