COVID VACCINES - NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
WALK-IN'S WELCOME FOR ALL VACCINATIONS
WE ARE APICK UP AND DROP OFF CENTER.... PACK AND SHIP TODAY!

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Cancer: Lung".

15 Nov

Few American Adults Are Being Screened for Lung Cancer, New Report Finds

Lung cancer remains the number one cancer killer in the U.S., but few eligible adults are being screened for the disease, the American Lung Association says.

16 Mar

Long COVID Patients at Risk for Chronic Lung Disease, Study Finds

Long COVID patients are experiencing disease in the small airways of their lungs, regardless of whether their initial infection was severe, researchers say.

Health News Results - 147

Annual lung cancer screening for heavy smokers can provide a big boost in lung cancer survival over the long term, a new study shows.

When low-dose CT screening identifies early-stage lung cancer, patients have an 80% chance of surviving 20 years, researchers found. And for some, the odds are as high as 100%.

But only 16% of lung cancers are caught early, and more than half of...

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- While marijuana legalization in some U.S. states and Canada may send a message that weed is harmless, that's not necessarily so, according to a new study that found lung damage was more common in marijuana smokers than tobacco users.

Research into marijuana's impact on the lungs is just getting started, because weed wasn't lega...

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Too few people are getting screened for lung cancer.

This is the message from the American Lung Association’s 2022 "State of Lung Cancer" report. Less than 6% of eligible Americans have been screened for lun...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Screening tests routinely catch cases of breast and colon cancer early, but a screening test for lung cancer is sorely underused in high-risk people and that needs to change, more than 50 cancer organizations said in a joint statement issued Tuesday.

What prompted the move? Low-dose CT screening is recommended for...

The latest statistics from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) show a continuing decline in the number of Americans who die from cancer, although there's been little change in the number of new cancer cases.

"From 2015 to 2019, overall cancer death rates decreased by 2.1% per year in men and women combined," according to a statement issued by the NCI on Thursday.

The biggest d...

When a man has cancer in an area that affects sexual function, his doctor is likely to discuss it with him.

But the same is not true for a woman who has cancer in a sex organ, according to new research. Investigators found 9 in 10 men were asked about their sexual health, yet only 1 in 10 women received the same care.

"There seems to be a big disparity in the way we approach sexual...

As doctors work toward developing more personalized cancer care, a new study looks at whether lung cancer patients can miss a few days of radiation treatment and make them up with a higher dose.

The more treatments a patient skips, the higher their risk of early death, according to the research from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. However, some patients may still benefit from re...

Teen vaping continues at concerning levels, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

About 2.5 million middle school and high school students reported that they had vaped in the past 30 days in 2022,...

Replacing diesel-powered trucks and the toxic pollutants they spew with electric vehicles would save tens of thousands of U.S. lives, a new American Lung Association report says.

The benefit would accrue if all medium- and heavy-duty trucks sold have zero emissions by 2050, and if the electricity they use comes from non-combustion renewable energy, not fossil fuels, by 2035, according to ...

Smoking isn't only costly in terms of health risks, it also cost the U.S. economy $891 billion in 2020.

That was almost 10 times the cigarette industry's $92 billion revenue, according to the authors of a new American Cancer Society study.

"Economic losses from cigarette smoking far outweigh any economic benefit from the tobacco industry -- wages, and salaries of those employed by t...

Lung cancer CT screening scans can catch tumors at an earlier and more treatable stage, a new study indicates.

The number of stage 1 lung cancers detected by doctors increased 8.4% after low-dose CT screening scans were implemented across four different health care sy...

Breathing in fumes from diesel exhaust may be more damaging to women than to men, a new, small Canadian study claims.

“We already know that there are sex differences in lung diseases such as asthma and respiratory infections," said lead researcher Hemshekhar Mahadevappa, from the University of Man...

Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect among women with lung cancer, a new study finds.

"The SHAWL [Sexual Health Assessment in Women with Lung Cancer] study is about bringing women's sexuality to the forefront of scientific discussions because it has been significantly understudied," said researcher Dr. Narjust Florez (Duma), associate director for the Cancer Care Equity Program at D...

Could cannabis end up being a gateway drug for cigarettes?

Possibly, said researchers from Columbia University, who found that adults who use pot daily do not perceive smoking a pack a day as being as harmful as those who do not use pot do.

"In the context of rec...

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but doctors have had access to a screening tool for nearly a decade that can catch it for early treatment.

Unfortunately, neither of those facts has sunk in for many Americans, according to a new survey from the American Lung Association (ALA).

Only 29% of Americans know that

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 1, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Dropping a load of pounds through weight-loss surgery can significantly decrease your risk of developing or dying from cancer, according to three new studies.

    Obese folks who underwent bariatric surgery were at least two times less likely to develop certain types of cancer and more than three times less likely to die of cancer than heavy people who didn't get the procedure, according to a...

    Pollution from varied sources caused 9 million deaths worldwide in 2019, accounting for 1 in 6 of all deaths, a new study says.

    Of those pollution-related deaths, three-quarters -- close to 7 million -- were caused by outdoor or indoor air pollution. Toxic chemical pollution (including lead) caused 1.8...

    Annual lung cancer screenings are strongly encouraged for men and women in danger of developing lung cancer. But new research finds that among those who do get assessed, nearly half fail to seek prompt follow-up care when the CT scans pick up a potential problem.

    The stats are troubling, said study author Dr. Matthew Triplette, who stressed "that the whole point of

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • May 18, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • More than 50,000 premature deaths would be prevented in the United States each year if fine particle air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels were eliminated, researchers say.

    Curbing this source of pollution would also save more than $600 billion a year in health care costs due to related illness and death, their

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • May 17, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Wildfires, like the one currently raging in New Mexico, are known to cause upticks in breathing issues and heart attacks in their immediate wake for folks who live nearby.

    Now, new Canadian research shows that these fires may also increase risk for lung and brain cancer o...

    Emphysema is missed more often in Black Americans than in white Americans, and now researchers report they have figured out why.

    The investigators found that many Black men who were considered to have normal results after race-specific interpretations of a common lung function test called spirometry actually had emphysema when assessed using computed tomography (CT).

    Emphysema invol...

    Lifelong smoker Mike James had quit the habit for nearly three years when, through fluky circumstances, he found out that he had a small tumor in his right lung.

    "I thought it was a death sentence," said James, 55, a public school educator in Boston. "I didn't tell anybody for two weeks. I didn't tell my wife. I didn't tell my family. I believe I lost 18 pounds in those two weeks, just fr...

    Strong natural protection against cancer-causing mutations may explain why some longtime smokers don't develop lung cancer, according to a new study.

    Researchers compared mutations in cells lining the lungs from 14 never-smokers, ages 11 to 86, and 19 smokers, ages 44 to 81. The smokers had used tobacco up to 116 pack years. One pack year equals 1 pack of cigarettes smoked every day for a...

    A proposed rule to ban ongoing uses of the only known form of asbestos imported into the United States has been introduced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    The ban would apply to chrysotile asbestos, which is known to cause cancer and is found in products like asbestos diaphragms, sheet gaske...

    Smoking pot through a bong doesn't protect the nonsmokers in the room from the dangers of secondhand smoke, a new study warns.

    Bongs have been touted as a safe way to protect nonsmokers from secondhand marijuana smoke. But it can expose them to extremely high concentrations of fine particulate matter - five to 1...

    More than 10,000 American lives have been saved since lung cancer screening was introduced for high-risk people who are over 55 and have a history of smoking, a new study shows.

    But many poor people and those in ethnic/racial minority groups are still missing out on the benefits of screening for the world's leading cause of cancer death, researchers noted.

    To assess the impacts of t...

    While smoking has declined in the United States, the rate of tobacco use in poorer communities is double nationwide levels, according to a new study.

    It also linked smoking to mental health conditions and substance use disorders in these communities. The findings highlight the need for targeted smoking prevention and cessation programs in less advantaged U.S. communities, researchers said...

    People with cancer may be at increased risk for a rare neurological disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome, new research has found.

    "Previous studies have suggested there may be a link between cancer and Guillain-Barré syndrome, but just how often people develop

  • |
  • March 3, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • People who go meat-free, or at least put limits on it, may have lower risks of some of the most common cancers, a new, large study suggests.

    British researchers stressed that their findings do not prove definitively that vegetarian/vegan diets cut people's cancer risks. In fact, there ...

    Dozens of different spray products -- deodorants, shampoos, sunscreens, athlete's foot treatments -- have been recalled in recent months due to contamination with the cancer-causing chemical benzene.

    Most recently, six Brut and Sure aerosol antiperspirants

  • |
  • February 24, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Gender differences extend to cancer treatments, with women having a higher risk of severe side effects from certain treatments than men, a new study finds.

    Previous research concluded women tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, and this new paper shows the same is true for

  • |
  • February 15, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Tobacco use is far and away the leading cause of lung cancer, but non-smokers are also at risk, experts say.

    People who smoke have the highest risk, and smokeless tobacco is also a threat. About 90% of lung cancer cases could be prevented by eliminating tobacco use, according to the World Health Organization...

    Think you're safe from lung cancer because you've never smoked? Think again.

    While cigarette smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, it's possible to get the disease without ever lighting up.

    "Anyone with lungs can get lung cancer," said Dr. Missak Haigentz Jr., chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick.

    ...

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    Cities worldwide are shrouded with air pollution -- and it's killing people.

    A new modeling study found that 86% of people living in cities throughout the world -- a total of 2.5 billion people -- are exposed to fine particulate matter at levels that exceed the World Health Organization's 2005 guidelines.

    In 2019, this urban air pollution led to 1.8 million excess deaths, accordin...

    For smokers, new research suggests it really is never too late to quit.

    The study found that folks who kick their habit after a lung cancer diagnosis will likely live longer than those who continue lighting up.

    Investigators from Italy concluded that lung cancer patients who stop smoking at or around the time of their diagnosis can look forward to survival times nearly a third (29%...

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • January 4, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Cancer remains a major killer, with 10 million deaths reported worldwide in 2019.

    More than 23 million new cases were documented globally in 2019, according to researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

    By comparison, in 2010 there were 8.29 million cancer deaths worldwide and fewer than 19 million new cases. Deaths were nearly 21% higher in 2019 than 2010, and...

    Wolfgang Lehner always considered himself "a triple threat" when it came to cancer risk.

    One grandfather died of lung cancer in the 1970s. His other grandfather had his own bout with stomach cancer. And Lehner himself was a smoker.

    Although the New York City cinematographer quit smoking in 2010, at age 51, he never quit worrying about lung cancer.

    In 2017 his worst fear was r...

    New research offers fresh proof that the COVID-19 pandemic delayed cancer diagnoses in the United States, increasing patients' risk for poor outcomes.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 9 million patients at over 1,200 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical facilities.

    Procedures to diagnose cancer were used less often and there were fewer new cancer diagnoses in 2020 t...

    U.S. cancer clinical trial participants have become more diverse in makeup, but certain groups remain underrepresented, a new study finds.

    It's important to have a wide range of participants in clinical trials, to find out if treatments are safe and effective for people with different characteristics, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which has a number of initiatives to b...

    A fatal heart attack or stroke is often the first indication of heart disease in middle-aged smokers, according to a new study.

    It also found that heart disease is the leading complication among smokers when compared with deaths from other causes -- including lung cancer. In addition, smoking is associated with developing heart disease at a younger age and shortening a person's life by as...

    Lung cancer survival rates in the United States continue to rise, but certain racial groups are still hit hard by the disease, the American Lung Association reports.

    Its fourth annual "State of Lung Cancer" report shows that the average five-year survival rate increased from 14.5% to nearly 24%, but it remains at 20% for people of color overall, and 18% for Black Americans.

    "The rep...

    Mike Smith is beating the odds.

    Diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer back in 2016, the 56-year-old South Carolina resident says there are a lot of reasons to be optimistic as the "narrative of lung cancer changes from being a horrific, terminal disease to a chronic disease and, ultimately, to a cure."

    Still, he remains clear-eyed about the challenges he faces.

    "I'm at war," he s...

    High-dose radiation therapy may stall tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer who are not fully responding to drug therapies, a preliminary study suggests.

    The study involved patients whose lung cancer was considered "oligoprogressive." That means the cancer had spread to other sites in the body, and the patients were having a mixed response to standard systemic treatments -- i...

    American cancer patients spent more than $21 billion on their care in 2019, a new report shows.

    That $21.09 billion included out-of-pocket costs of $16.22 billion and patient time costs of $4.87 billion. Patient time costs are the value of the time patients spend traveling for, waiting for and receiving care.

    "As the costs of cancer treatment continue to rise, greater attention to a...

    Smokers who kick the habit before age 45 can nearly eliminate their excess risk of dying from lung or other cancers, a new study estimates.

    It's well-established that after smokers quit, their risk of tobacco-related cancers drops substantially over time.

    Researchers said the new findings underscore the power of quitting as early as possible. Among more than 400,000 Americans they f...

    Persistent depression can significantly shorten lung cancer survival -- even if patients receive the latest cancer treatments, new research shows.

    "We need to help these patients, not only at diagnosis, but throughout treatment to take depressive symptoms out of the equation and let these impressive new therapies do their jobs," said lead author Barbara Anderson, a professor of psychology...

    Private insurers paid out about $156.2 billion in 2018 for U.S. patients with the 15 most common cancers.

    Medication was the largest expense and drugs for breast, lung, lymphoma and colon cancers accounted for the largest chunk of those costs, according to a Penn State College of Medicine study.

    "The public often hears that the U.S. spends an inordinate amount of money on health car...

    Show All Health News Results